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The Effect Of Campaign Contributions On State Banking Regulation And Bank Expansion In U.S

Author

Listed:
  • Aggey Semenov

    (University of Ottawa)

  • Hector Perez Saiz

    (Bank of Canada)

Abstract

We use a unique detailed database with individual state campaign contributions made by banks in U.S. from 1998 to 2010 to understand how these contributions influence the regulation of the banking industry in that state, and in particular the approval of bank mergers by the state banking regulatory authority. We find that banks tend to contribute more to candidates that play a key role in appointing the head of the state banking regulator. In addition, we find that, after controlling for size or other key bank level variables, banks that are involved in a merger in the near future are more likely to contribute to elected senators and the governor, who play key roles in appointing the head of the state bank regulator that approves mergers which involve state banks. Our results help to understand better the role that campaign contributions have in the shaping of bank regulation in U.S. and the bank market structure in the last two decades.

Suggested Citation

  • Aggey Semenov & Hector Perez Saiz, 2014. "The Effect Of Campaign Contributions On State Banking Regulation And Bank Expansion In U.S," 2014 Meeting Papers 1265, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed014:1265
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    File URL: https://www.economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2014/paper_1265.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gazi Kara & Youngsuk Yook, 2019. "Policy Uncertainty and Bank Mortgage Credit," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2019-066, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    2. Gazi I Kara & Youngsuk Yook, 2019. "Policy Uncertainty and Bank Mortgage Credit," BIS Working Papers 820, Bank for International Settlements.

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