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Demand shocks and open economy puzzles

Author

Listed:
  • Jose-Victor Rios-Rull

    (University of Minnesota)

  • Yan Bai

    (University of Rochester)

Abstract

The paper explores to what extent demand shocks can solve the open economy puz- zles. To this purpose, we pose a shopping model structure a la Bai, R Ì Ä±os-Rull, and Storesletten (2011) on top of an otherwise standard two-country international real busi- ness cycle model. Shopping for goods take effort, which prevents perfect matching between potential customers and producers. Larger demand in a country increases its consumption for both home and foreign goods. Real exchange rate and terms of trade depreciate in response to the larger demand. Larger demand also induces more shop- ping and so higher output and TFP. Thus, demand shock under our shopping model generates countercyclical terms of trade and solves the Backus-Smith puzzle.

Suggested Citation

  • Jose-Victor Rios-Rull & Yan Bai, 2013. "Demand shocks and open economy puzzles," 2013 Meeting Papers 523, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed013:523
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pawel Borys & Pawel Doligalski & Pawel Kopiec, 2021. "The Quantitative Importance of Technology and Demand Shocks for Unemployment Fluctuations in a Shopping Economy," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 21/743, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    2. Li, Wei & Luo, Yulei & Nie, Jun, 2017. "Elastic attention, risk sharing, and international comovements," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 1-20.
    3. Dudley Cooke, 2019. "Consumer Search, Incomplete Exchange Rate Pass‐Through, and Optimal Interest Rate Policy," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 51(2-3), pages 455-484, March.
    4. Adams, Jonathan J. & Barrett, Philip, 2021. "Why are countries’ asset portfolios exposed to nominal exchange rates?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 110(C).
    5. Crespo, Aranzazu; Muñoz-Sepulveda, Jesus A., 2015. "The Role of Physical and Financial Constraints in Export Dynamics," Economics Working Papers MWP2015/17, European University Institute.
    6. Ling Sun, 2018. "Delayed Output Response to Productivity Shocks in a Monetary Search Model," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 46(3), pages 251-266, September.
    7. Eleni Iliopulos & Erica Perego & Thepthida Sopraseuth, 2018. "International business cycles: Information matters," THEMA Working Papers 2018-13, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    8. Jiang, Mingming, 2017. "On demand shocks and international business cycle puzzles," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 29-32.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • F44 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Business Cycles

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