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Co-movement in Inflation

  • Hugo Gerard

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

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    Inflation rates across countries tend to exhibit a degree of co-movement. In this paper we use a panel vector autoregression (panel VAR) model to investigate possible explanations of this co-movement for the G7 economies. Shocks to commodity prices are found to be more important than common movements in real activity as a driver of 'global inflation' dynamics. However, commodity prices and common real activity cannot explain all of the co-movement in inflation. Even when controlling for these factors, a common indicator of inflation still offers explanatory power for domestic inflation in the panel VAR. Given the role of global inflation in explaining inflation in the G7 countries, we then consider the significance of global inflation for Australian inflation. We find that movements in international inflation offer useful information when included in models of Australian inflation, particularly headline inflation.

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    Paper provided by Reserve Bank of Australia in its series RBA Research Discussion Papers with number rdp2012-01.

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    Date of creation: Mar 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:rba:rbardp:rdp2012-01
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    1. Matteo Ciccarelli & Beno�t Mojon, 2010. "Global Inflation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(3), pages 524-535, August.
    2. Matthieu Bussière & Alexander Chudik & Giulia Sestieri, 2012. "Modelling global trade flows: results from a GVAR model," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 119, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    3. Dees, S. & di Mauro, F. & Pesaran, M.H. & Smith, L.V., 2005. "Exploring the International Linkages of the Euro Area: a Global VAR Analysis," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0518, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    4. Doyle, Matthew & Beaudry, Paul, 2000. "What Happened to the Phillips Curve in the 1990s in Canada," Staff General Research Papers 10286, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    5. Mario J. Crucini & M. Ayhan Kose & Christopher Otrok, 2008. "What Are the Driving Forces of International Business Cycles?," NBER Working Papers 14380, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Neely, Christopher J. & Rapach, David E., 2011. "International comovements in inflation rates and country characteristics," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(7), pages 1471-1490.
    7. M. Ayhan Kose & Christopher Otrok & Charles H. Whiteman, 2003. "International Business Cycles: World, Region, and Country-Specific Factors," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1216-1239, September.
    8. Laurence M. Ball, 2006. "Has Globalization Changed Inflation?," NBER Working Papers 12687, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Haroon Mumtaz & Saverio Simonelli & Paolo Surico, 2011. "International Comovements, Business Cycle and Inflation: a Historical Perspective," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 14(1), pages 176-198, January.
    10. Henriksen, Espen & Kydland, Finn E. & Šustek, Roman, 2013. "Globally correlated nominal fluctuations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(6), pages 613-631.
    11. Koop, Gary & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Potter, Simon M., 1996. "Impulse response analysis in nonlinear multivariate models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 119-147, September.
    12. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2010. "Modeling inflation after the crisis," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 173-220.
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