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Children in jobless households across Europe: Evidence on the association with medium- and long-term outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Paul Gregg

    () (Department of Social & Policy Sciences, University of Bath)

  • John Jerrim

    () (Department of Social Science, UCL Institute of Education, University College London)

  • Lindsey Macmillan

    () (Department of Social Science, UCL Institute of Education, University College London)

  • Nikki Shure

    () (Department of Social Science, UCL Institute of Education and Institute of Labor Economics)

Abstract

The proportion of children living in a jobless household is a key indicator of social exclusion across Europe. Yet there is little existing evidence on the extent to which this measure of childhood deprivation is associated with later life outcomes. We use two harmonised cross-national data sources, the European Survey of Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) from 2011 and the Programme for International Student Attainment (PISA) from 2012, to address this question. We consider the association between children experiencing jobless households and three medium- and long-term outcomes: education, adult worklessness and adult poverty. We find evidence of large penalties to experiencing a jobless household in childhood across all three outcomes in some countries while in other countries there is no longer-term consequences of this indicator of social exclusion. Countries with high levels of children in jobless households such as the UK, Belgium and Ireland typically have more severe penalties for the medium- and longer-term outcomes of those children, although this varies by gender. This research suggests that this is a powerful measure of social exclusion, predicting severely limited life chances for the next generation.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Gregg & John Jerrim & Lindsey Macmillan & Nikki Shure, 2017. "Children in jobless households across Europe: Evidence on the association with medium- and long-term outcomes," DoQSS Working Papers 17-05, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:qss:dqsswp:1705
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jo Blanden & Paul Gregg & Lindsey Macmillan, 2007. "Accounting for Intergenerational Income Persistence: Noncognitive Skills, Ability and Education," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(519), pages 43-60, March.
    2. Corak,Miles (ed.), 2004. "Generational Income Mobility in North America and Europe," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521827607, January.
    3. Paul Gregg & Rosanna Scutella & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2010. "Reconciling workless measures at the individual and household level. Theory and evidence from the United States, Britain, Germany, Spain and Australia," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(1), pages 139-167, January.
    4. Stevens, Ann Huff & Schaller, Jessamyn, 2011. "Short-run effects of parental job loss on children's academic achievement," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 289-299, April.
    5. Gary S. Becker & Nigel Tomes, 1994. "Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 257-298 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Miles Corak, 2013. "Income Inequality, Equality of Opportunity, and Intergenerational Mobility," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 27(3), pages 79-102, Summer.
    7. Solon, Gary, 1992. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 393-408, June.
    8. Mari Rege & Kjetil Telle & Mark Votruba, 2011. "Parental Job Loss and Children's School Performance," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 78(4), pages 1462-1489.
    9. Lindsey Macmillan, 2014. "Intergenerational worklessness in the UK and the role of local labour markets," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(3), pages 871-889.
    10. Tyra Ekhaugen, 2009. "Extracting the causal component from the intergenerational correlation in unemployment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(1), pages 97-113, January.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    PISA; Worklessness; Joblessness; Poverty; Intergenerational mobility; Education inequality;

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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