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Short-run Effects of Parental Job Loss on Children's Academic Achievement

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  • Ann Huff Stevens
  • Jessamyn Schaller

Abstract

We study the relationship between parental job loss and children's academic achievement using data on job loss and grade retention from the 1996, 2001, and 2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation. We find that a parental job loss increases the probability of children's grade retention by 0.8 percentage points, or around 15 percent. After conditioning on child fixed effects, there is no evidence of significantly increased grade retention prior to the job loss, suggesting a causal link between the parental employment shock and children's academic difficulties. These effects are concentrated among children whose parents have a high school education or less.

Suggested Citation

  • Ann Huff Stevens & Jessamyn Schaller, 2009. "Short-run Effects of Parental Job Loss on Children's Academic Achievement," NBER Working Papers 15480, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15480
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    Cited by:

    1. Liu, Hong & Zhao, Zhong, 2014. "Parental job loss and children's health: Ten years after the massive layoff of the SOEs' workers in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 303-319.
    2. Elizabeth M. Caucutt & Lance Lochner & Youngmin Park, 2017. "Correlation, Consumption, Confusion, or Constraints: Why Do Poor Children Perform so Poorly?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 119(1), pages 102-147, January.
    3. Viola Angelini & Marco Bertoni & Luca Corazzini, 2015. "The Causal Effect of Paternal Unemployment on Children's Personality," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 795, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    4. Steffen Müller & Regina T. Riphahn & Caroline Schwientek, 2017. "Paternal unemployment during childhood: causal effects on youth worklessness and educational attainment," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(1), pages 213-238.
    5. Neil Reid & Michael C. Carroll & Xinyue Ye, 2013. "The Great Recession of 2007-2009," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 27(2), pages 87-89, May.
    6. Michael W. L. Elsby & Bart Hobijn & Aysegul Sahin, 2010. "The Labor Market in the Great Recession," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 41(1 (Spring), pages 1-69.
    7. Jesse Rothstein, 2012. "The Labor Market Four Years into the Crisis: Assessing Structural Explanations," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 65(3), pages 467-500, July.
    8. Steven J. Davis & Till Von Wachter, 2011. "Recessions and the Costs of Job Loss," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 42(2 (Fall)), pages 1-72.
    9. Schaller, Jessamyn & Stevens, Ann Huff, 2015. "Short-run effects of job loss on health conditions, health insurance, and health care utilization," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 190-203.
    10. Coelli, Michael B., 2011. "Parental job loss and the education enrollment of youth," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 25-35, January.
    11. Rothstein, Jesse, 2015. "The Great Recession and its Aftermath: What Role for Structural Changes?," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt0gn7w7hn, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
    12. Laukkonen, Marja-Lisa, 2018. "Parental Job Loss and Application Decisions in Finnish Post-Secondary Education," ETLA Working Papers 55, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    13. Kukla-Acevedo, Sharon & Heflin, Colleen M., 2014. "Unemployment insurance effects on child academic outcomes: Results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(P3), pages 246-252.
    14. Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, 2015. "Job Loss at Home: Children's School Performance During the Great Recession in Spain," CEP Discussion Papers dp1364, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    15. Paul Gregg & John Jerrim & Lindsey Macmillan & Nikki Shure, 2017. "Children in jobless households across Europe: Evidence on the association with medium- and long-term outcomes," DoQSS Working Papers 17-05, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    16. Jessamyn Schaller & Mariana Zerpa, 2015. "Short-run Effects of Parental Job Loss on Child Health," NBER Working Papers 21745, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Bradley Hardy, 2014. "Childhood Income Volatility and Adult Outcomes," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(5), pages 1641-1665, October.
    18. Lindo, Jason M., 2011. "Parental job loss and infant health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 869-879.
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    20. Anger, Silke & Camehl, Georg & Peter, Frauke, 2017. "Involuntary job loss and changes in personality traits," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 71-91.
    21. Peter, Frauke, 2016. "The effect of involuntary maternal job loss on children's behaviour and non-cognitive skills," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 43-63.
    22. Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer, 2015. "Job loss at home: children’s school performanceduring the Great Recession in Spain," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 63804, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    23. Michele Di Maio & Roberto Nisticò, 2016. "The Effect of Parental Job Loss on Child School Dropout: Evidence from the Occupied Palestinian Territories," CSEF Working Papers 456, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 06 Feb 2018.
    24. S. Elif Filiz, 2016. "Mothers’ Involuntary Job Loss and Children’s Academic Achievement," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 98-127, March.
    25. Zwysen, Wouter, 2013. "Where you go depends on where you come from: the influence of father’s employment status on young adult’s labour market experiences," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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