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Short-run effects of parental job loss on children's academic achievement

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  • Stevens, Ann Huff
  • Schaller, Jessamyn

Abstract

We study the relationship between parental job loss and children's academic achievement using data on job loss and grade retention from the 1996, 2001, and 2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation. We find that a parental job loss increases the probability of children's grade retention by 0.8 percentage points, or around 15%. After conditioning on child fixed effects, there is no evidence of significantly increased grade retention prior to the job loss, suggesting a causal link running from the parental employment shock to children's academic difficulties.

Suggested Citation

  • Stevens, Ann Huff & Schaller, Jessamyn, 2011. "Short-run effects of parental job loss on children's academic achievement," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 289-299, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:30:y:2011:i:2:p:289-299
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Displaced Unemployment K-12 Schooling;

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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