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Endogenous Growth and Demographic Transition in a model of Cultural Transmission

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  • Zakharenko, Roman

Abstract

Demographic transition theory is developed highlighting cultural transmission pattern as key driver. Individuals maximize cultural fitness, i.e. rate of own cultural type absorbtion by future generations. With low population density, one's culture can be picked up only by own children, thus cultural fitness equals genetic fitness, individuals allocate all energy surplus to reproduction, and Malthusian regime occurs. With rising population density, cultural transmission between non-relatives accelerates; knowledge production by an individual makes her culture more attractive. Individuals reallocate some of energy surplus from reproduction to knowledge production, causing technological growth. The model fits observed demographic transition patterns.

Suggested Citation

  • Zakharenko, Roman, 2014. "Endogenous Growth and Demographic Transition in a model of Cultural Transmission," MPRA Paper 58395, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:58395
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Zakharenko, Roman, 2018. "Dead men tell no tales: how the Homo sapiens became Homo economicus," MPRA Paper 90643, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Endogenous growth; Cultural transmission; Demographic transition;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • O44 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Environment and Growth
    • Z19 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Other

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