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Does Monetary Policy Matter in China? A Narrative Approach

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  • Sun, Rongrong

Abstract

This paper applies the narrative approach to monetary policy in China to tackle two problems of policy measurement. The first problem arises because the PBC (the central bank of China) applies multiple instruments and none of them per se can adequately reflect changes in its monetary policy. The second one is the classical identification problem: the causation direction of the observed interaction between central bank actions and real activity needs to be identified. The PBC’s documents are used to infer the intentions behind policy movements. Three shocks are identified for the period 2000-2011 that are exogenous to real output. Estimates using these shocks and various robustness tests indicate that monetary policy has large and persistent impact on output in China.

Suggested Citation

  • Sun, Rongrong, 2012. "Does Monetary Policy Matter in China? A Narrative Approach," MPRA Paper 45023, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:45023
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christina D. Romer & David H. Romer, 2004. "A New Measure of Monetary Shocks: Derivation and Implications," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 1055-1084, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Deng, Kaihua & Todd, Walker, 2016. "Is the US quantitative easing more effective than China's? A second thought," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 11-23.
    2. Hyeongwoo Kim & Wen Shi, 2014. "The Determinants of the Benchmark Interest Rates in China: A Discrete Choice Model Approach," Auburn Economics Working Paper Series auwp2014-12, Department of Economics, Auburn University.
    3. repec:eee:chieco:v:44:y:2017:i:c:p:166-185 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Chi-Wei Su & Jiao-Jiao Fan & Hsu-Ling Chang & Xiao-Lin Li, 2016. "Is there Causal Relationship between Money Supply Growth and Inflation in China? Evidence from Quantity Theory of Money," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(3), pages 702-719, August.
    5. Sun, Rongrong, 2015. "What measures Chinese monetary policy?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 263-286.
    6. Kim, Won Joong & Hammoudeh, Shawkat & Hyun, Jun Seog & Gupta, Rangan, 2017. "Oil price shocks and China's economy: Reactions of the monetary policy to oil price shocks," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 61-69.
    7. Jarko Fidrmuc & Martin Siddiqui, 2015. "Exchange Rate Policy in China after the Financial Crisis: Evidence from Time-varying Exchange Rate Basket," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 608-623, August.
    8. Sun, Rongrong, 2014. "Review over Empirical Evidence on Real Effects of Monetary Policy," MPRA Paper 58513, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Chen, Hongyi & Chow, Kenneth & Tillmann, Peter, 2017. "The effectiveness of monetary policy in China: Evidence from a Qual VAR," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 216-231.
    10. Klingelhöfer, Jan & Sun, Rongrong, 2017. "Macroprudential Policy, Central Banks and Financial Stability: Evidence from China," MPRA Paper 79033, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. repec:eee:ecmode:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:32-40 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Akhand Akhtar Hossain, 2015. "The Evolution of Central Banking and Monetary Policy in the Asia-Pacific," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14611.
    13. Sun, Rongrong, 2015. "A Narrative Indicator of Monetary Conditions in China," MPRA Paper 64166, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    exogenous shocks; the narrative approach; real effects of monetary policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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