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The impact of husband's job loss on partners' mental health

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  • Mendolia, Silvia

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to examine the impact of job loss on family mental well-being. The negative income shock can affect the mental health status of the individual who directly experiences such displacement, as well as the psychological well-being of his partner; also, job loss may have a significantly detrimental effect on life satisfaction, self-esteem and on the individual’s perceived role in society. This analysis is based on a sample of married and cohabitating couples from the first 14 waves of the British Household Panel Survey. In order to correct for the possible endogeneity of job loss, data from employment histories is utilised and redundancies (different from dismissals) in declining industries are used as an indicator of exogenous job loss. Results show evidence that couples in which the husband experiences a job loss are more likely to experience poor mental health.

Suggested Citation

  • Mendolia, Silvia, 2011. "The impact of husband's job loss on partners' mental health," MPRA Paper 41847, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:41847
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephan Goetz & Meri Davlasheridze & Yicheol Han, 2015. "County-Level Determinants of Mental Health, 2002–2008," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 124(2), pages 657-670, November.
    2. Lars Kunze & Nicolai Suppa, 2017. "The Effect of Unemployment on Social Participation of Spouses: Evidence from Plant Closures in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 898, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. Milena Nikolova & Sinem Ayhan, 2016. "Your Spouse Is Fired! How Much Do You Care?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 891, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    4. Pınar Mine Güneş, 2016. "The effects of teenage childbearing on long-term health in the US: a twin-fixed-effects approach," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 891-920, December.
    5. repec:spr:izalbr:v:6:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40172-017-0056-1 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job loss Mental health Income shock Psychological well-being;

    JEL classification:

    • I00 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General - - - General
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure

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