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The consequences of own and spousal disability on labor market outcomes and subjective well-being: evidence from Germany

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  • Nils Braakmann

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Abstract

In this paper, I contrast the effects of individual and spousal disability on subjective well-being and labor supply using data on couples from the German Socio-Economic Panel for the years 1984–2006. I find almost no effects in terms of labor market outcomes for both men and women, which stands in stark contrast to the effects of individual disability. The life-satisfaction of women, but not of men, is reduced considerably by their partners’ disability. The effects are about 50–73 % as large as those of individual disability. I also find no evidence that individuals adapt to their partners’ disability, although there is adaptation to individual disability. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Nils Braakmann, 2014. "The consequences of own and spousal disability on labor market outcomes and subjective well-being: evidence from Germany," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 717-736, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:12:y:2014:i:4:p:717-736
    DOI: 10.1007/s11150-012-9164-7
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    Cited by:

    1. Aitor Calo-Blanco, 2017. "Health and fairness with other-regarding preferences," Working Papers 17.04, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Disability; Labor supply; Subjective well-being; Adaptation; Other-regarding preferences; D64; I10; J14;

    JEL classification:

    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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