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Women's Labor Market Reactions to Family Disruptions

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  • Haurin, Donald R

Abstract

Measuring the labor-force response of a woman to changes in her husband's earnings is the goal of this dynamic model. Allowing for uncertainty, the model modifies the constant shadow price of initial assests framework so that the shadow price varies over time. It is shown that the change in a woman's labor supply is related to the deviation of the husband's actual work hours from the expected amount. The estimation indicates that the largest response to the loss of husband's income occurs with a divorce or separation; smaller effects are noted for widowhood, and husband's unexpected unemployment or health change. Copyright 1989 by MIT Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Haurin, Donald R, 1989. "Women's Labor Market Reactions to Family Disruptions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 71(1), pages 54-61, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:71:y:1989:i:1:p:54-61
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    Cited by:

    1. Michele J. Siegel, 2006. "Measuring the effect of husband's health on wife's labor supply," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(6), pages 579-601.
    2. Michelle Sheran Sylvester, 2007. "The Career and Family Choices of Women: A Dynamic Analysis of Labor Force Participation, Schooling, Marriage and Fertility Decisions," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(3), pages 367-399, July.
    3. Marco Francesconi, 2002. "A Joint Dynamic Model of Fertility and Work of Married Women," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(2), pages 336-380, Part.
    4. Haardt, David, 2007. "Older couples' labour market reactions to family disruptions," ISER Working Paper Series 2007-08, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Jeon, Sung-Hee & Pohl, R. Vincent, 2017. "Health and work in the family: Evidence from spouses’ cancer diagnoses," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 1-18.
    6. Matthias Staat & Gerhard Wagenhals, 1996. "Lone mothers: A review," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 9(2), pages 131-140, June.
    7. Melissa Bjelland, 2005. "Are the Lasting Effects of Employee-Employer Separations induced by Layoff and Disability Similar? Exploring Job Displacement using Survey and Administrative Data," Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Technical Papers 2005-03, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    8. Matthieu Bunel, 2002. "Added worker effect revisited through the French working time reduction experiment," Post-Print halshs-00178452, HAL.
    9. Mueller, Richard E., 2005. "The effect of marital dissolution on the labour supply of males and females: Evidence from Canada," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 787-809, December.
    10. Papps, Kerry L., 2006. "The Effects of Divorce Risk on the Labour Supply of Married Couples," IZA Discussion Papers 2395, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Matthieu Bunel, 2004. "Les conjoints des salariés passés à 35 heures travaillent-ils davantage ? Une analyse de l'offre de travail familiale sur données françaises," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 164(3), pages 165-188.
    12. Maczulskij, Terhi & Böckerman, Petri, 2017. "Harsh Times: Do Stressors Lead to Labor Market Losses?," IZA Discussion Papers 10773, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Barbara A. Butrica, 1999. "The Impact of Future Divorce on Labor Supply and Work Hours of German Married Women," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 68(2), pages 249-254.
    14. Nils Braakmann, 2014. "The consequences of own and spousal disability on labor market outcomes and subjective well-being: evidence from Germany," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 717-736, December.
    15. Skoufias, Emmanual & Parker, Susan W., 2002. "Labor market shocks and their impacts on work and schooling," FCND briefs 129, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. William C. Horrace, 2002. "Selection Procedures for Order Statistics in Empirical Economic Studies," Econometrics 0206005, EconWPA.
    17. Janet Netz & Jon Haveman, 1999. "All In The Family: Family, Income, And Labor Force Attachment," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 85-106.
    18. Chung, Eui-Chul & Haurin, Donald R., 2002. "Housing choices and uncertainty: the impact of stochastic events," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 193-216, September.

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