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Training, education and productivity

  • Carmichael, Fiona
  • Ercolani, Marco
  • Kang, Lili
  • Maimaiti, Yasheng
  • O'Mahony, Mary
  • Peng, Fei
  • Robinson, Catherine

This paper investigates the impact of training and education on productivity, in particular linking to a literature that emphasizes the need to reorganise production following adoption of ICT. The paper examines training at the total economy level and variation across industries, focusing especially on manufacturing versus market service sectors. It also examines the characteristics of those who receive training and outlines the incentives that underlie this.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/39899/1/MPRA_paper_39899.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 39899.

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Date of creation: 2009
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:39899
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  1. Lorraine Dearden & Howard Reed & John Van Reenen, 2006. "The Impact of Training on Productivity and Wages: Evidence from British Panel Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(4), pages 397-421, 08.
  2. Chander, Parkash & Thangavelu, Shandre M., 2004. "Technology adoption, education and immigration policy," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 79-94, October.
  3. Elhanan Helpman & Antonio Rangel, 1998. "Adjusting to a New Technology: Experience and Training," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1833, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  4. O'Mahony, Mary & Peng, Fei, 2009. "Skill bias, age and organizational change," MPRA Paper 38767, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Thomas Zwick, 2003. "The Impact of ICT Investment on Establishment Productivity," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 184(1), pages 99-110, April.
  6. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, Enero.
  7. Eder, Lauren B. & Igbaria, Magid, 2001. "Determinants of intranet diffusion and infusion," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 233-242, June.
  8. Mauro Giorgio Marrano & Jonathan Haskel & Gavin Wallis, 2009. "What Happened To The Knowledge Economy? Ict, Intangible Investment, And Britain'S Productivity Record Revisited," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(3), pages 686-716, 09.
  9. Stephen Machin & John Van Reenen, 1998. "Technology and changes in skill structure: evidence from seven OECD countries," IFS Working Papers W98/04, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  10. Mary O'Mahony & Michela Vecchi, 2005. "Quantifying the Impact of ICT Capital on Output Growth: A Heterogeneous Dynamic Panel Approach," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 72(288), pages 615-633, November.
  11. Anna Vignoles & Fernando Galindo-Rueda & Leon Feinstein, 2004. "The Labour Market Impact of Adult Education and Training: A Cohort Analysis," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 51(2), pages 266-280, 05.
  12. Giorgio Marrano, Mauro & Haskel, Jonathan, 2007. "How Much Does the UK Invest in Intangible Assets?," CEPR Discussion Papers 6287, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. Kyoji Fukao & Tsutomu Miyagawa & Kentaro Mukai & Yukio Shinoda & Konomi Tonogi, 2009. "Intangible Investment In Japan: Measurement And Contribution To Economic Growth," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(3), pages 717-736, 09.
  14. Conti, Gabriella, 2005. "Training, productivity and wages in Italy," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 557-576, August.
  15. Nicholas Oulton, 2001. "ICT and productivity growth in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 140, Bank of England.
  16. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-26, November.
  17. Irene Bertschek & Ulrich Kaiser, 2004. "Productivity Effects of Organizational Change: Microeconometric Evidence," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 50(3), pages 394-404, March.
  18. Lynch, Lisa M, 1992. "Private-Sector Training and the Earnings of Young Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 299-312, March.
  19. Ethan Lewis, 2005. "Immigration, skill mix, and the choice of technique," Working Papers 05-8, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  20. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  21. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2002. "Information Technology, Workplace Organization, and the Demand for Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(1), pages 339-376.
  22. Ann P. Bartel & Nachum Sicherman, 1999. "Technological Change and Wages: An Interindustry Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(2), pages 285-325, April.
  23. Booth, Alison L, 1991. "Job-Related Formal Training: Who Receives It and What Is It Worth?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 53(3), pages 281-94, August.
  24. Bruce Chapman & Thomas F. Crossley & Taejong Kim, 2002. "Credit Constraints and Training after Job Loss," Department of Economics Working Papers 2002-15, McMaster University.
  25. Carol Corrado & Charles R. Hulten & Daniel E. Sichel, 2006. "Intangible capital and economic growth," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2006-24, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  26. Ken Mayhew & Andy Neely, 2006. "Improving Productivity--Opening the Black Box," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(4), pages 445-456, Winter.
  27. Nicola Matteucci & Mary O'Mahony & Catherine Robinson & Thomas Zwick, 2005. "Productivity, Workplace Performance And Ict: Industry And Firm-Level Evidence For Europe And The Us," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 52(3), pages 359-386, 07.
  28. Black, Sandra E & Lynch, Lisa M, 1996. "Human-Capital Investments and Productivity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 263-267, May.
  29. Daron Acemoglu, 1997. "Training and Innovation in an Imperfect Labour Market," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(3), pages 445-464.
  30. Gérard Ballot & Fathi Fakhfakh & Erol Taymaz, 2006. "Who Benefits from Training and R&D, the Firm or the Workers?," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 44(3), pages 473-495, 09.
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