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How Much Does the UK Invest in Intangible Assets?


  • Giorgio Marrano, Mauro
  • Haskel, Jonathan


We attempt to replicate for the UK the Corrado, Hulten and Sichel (2005, 2006) work on spending on intangible assets in the US. Their work suggests private sector expenditure (investment) on intangibles is about 13% (11%) of US GDP 1998-2000, with intangible investment about equal to tangible capital investment. Our work, using a similar method, suggests the UK private sector spent, in 2004, about £127bn on intangibles, which is about 11% of UK GDP. The implied investment figure is around £116bn (10% of GDP) which is about equal to UK investment in tangible assets. Of the £127bn expenditure, (in round numbers) about 15% is spent on software, about 10% on scientific R&D, almost 20% on non-scientific R&D (design, product development etc.), about 14% on branding, about 20% on training and the rest on organisational capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Giorgio Marrano, Mauro & Haskel, Jonathan, 2007. "How Much Does the UK Invest in Intangible Assets?," CEPR Discussion Papers 6287, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:6287

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    intangible assets; investment; organisational capital; R&D; training;

    JEL classification:

    • E1 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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