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Asset Prices, Nominal Rigidities, and Monetary Policy: Role of Price Indexation

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  • Nutahara, Kengo

Abstract

Carlstrom and Fuerst (2007) [``Asset prices, nominal rigidities, and monetary policy,'' Review of Economic Dynamics 10, 256--275] find that monetary policy response to share prices is a source of equilibrium indeterminacy because an increase in inflation implies a high real marginal cost and low share prices in a sticky-price economy. We find that if the New Keynesian Phillips curve has a lagged inflation term caused by price indexation, this effect is weakened. Moreover, equilibrium indeterminacy caused by monetary policy response to share prices never arises if all the firms that cannot re-optimize their prices follow price indexation.

Suggested Citation

  • Nutahara, Kengo, 2011. "Asset Prices, Nominal Rigidities, and Monetary Policy: Role of Price Indexation," MPRA Paper 29859, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:29859
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 2001. "Should Central Banks Respond to Movements in Asset Prices?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 253-257, May.
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    6. Charles T. Carlstrom & Timothy Fuerst, 2007. "Asset Prices, Nominal Rigidities, and Monetary Policy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(2), pages 256-275, April.
    7. Fuhrer, Jeffrey C., 2010. "Inflation Persistence," Handbook of Monetary Economics, in: Benjamin M. Friedman & Michael Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 9, pages 423-486, Elsevier.
    8. Faia, Ester & Monacelli, Tommaso, 2007. "Optimal interest rate rules, asset prices, and credit frictions," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(10), pages 3228-3254, October.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    asset prices; monetary policy; equilibrium determinacy; price indexation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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