IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper

Where are the poor in International Economics?

  • Luis Carvalho

    ()

    (Faculdade de Economia, Universidade do Porto)

  • Aurora A.C. Teixeira

    ()

    (CEF.UP, Faculdade de Economia, Universidade do Porto; INESC Porto; OBEGEF)

Despite the fact that a very significant proportion of the human population is living with financial difficulties and other constraints typical of poverty, scientific studies in the areas of Economics and especially in International Economics that address the issue of poverty and of poor countries are very few. Using bibliometric techniques, we measured the attention paid by authors from the field of International Economics to poverty and poor countries. To this end, we sorted and analyzed all articles published in the most important journal in the field, the Journal of International Economics (JIE) over the last forty years. Evidence shows that the authors who have published articles in the JIE have mostly developed studies focused on ‘Meso (industry, region) and microeconomic policies and issues of ‘International Trade’ and ‘International Finances’, and are usually of the ‘Formal’ and ‘Formal and Empirical’ types, where the topic ‘Poverty’ is very marginal (only 13 articles published in the JIE, less than 1% of the total, address this matter in any of its dimensions). Furthermore, in the more empirical articles, no country among those included in the group ‘Less Developed Countries’ deserved particular attention. The neglect of poverty and of the poor contrasts (and is related to) with the significant weight of articles that make use of formalization (more than 80%). Despite the trend for a decrease in exclusively ‘Formal’ articles, without any applied/empirical component, the (still) excessive focus on ‘mathematical’ accuracy (i.e., formalization), and the concomitant limited capacity to deal with the (social) problems of the real world, is an effective challenge to authors in the field of international economics and, in particular, to those who publish in the JIE, which must be overcome if we do not want international economics to become a “cyborg” science.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.fep.up.pt/investigacao/workingpapers/11.09.09_wp425.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto in its series FEP Working Papers with number 425.

as
in new window

Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:por:fepwps:425
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200 PORTO

Phone: 351-22-5571100
Fax: 351-22-5505050
Web page: http://www.fep.up.pt/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Edmonds, Eric V. & Pavcnik, Nina, 2006. "International trade and child labor: Cross-country evidence," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 115-140, January.
  2. Andrea Brandolini & Silvia Magri & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2010. "Asset-based measurement of poverty," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(2), pages 267-284.
  3. Lee, Chaehwa & Wilhelm, Wilbert, 2010. "On integrating theories of international economics in the strategic planning of global supply chains and facility location," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(1), pages 225-240, March.
  4. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2004. "Macroeconomic Adjustment and the Poor: Analytical Issues and Cross-Country Evidence," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18, pages 351-408, 07.
  5. Choi, Yo Chul & Hummels, David & Xiang, Chong, 2009. "Explaining import quality: The role of the income distribution," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 265-275, April.
  6. Feeney, JoAnne & Hillman, Arye L., 2004. "Trade liberalization through asset markets," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 151-167, October.
  7. Étienne Gilbert, 1983. "A. Sen, Poverty and Famines, an essay on Entitlement and Deprivation," Revue Tiers Monde, Programme National Persée, vol. 24(93), pages 211-211.
  8. Polasky, Stephen, 2008. "Comments on ‘Key issues for attention from ecological economists’ by Paul Ehrlich," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(01), pages 25-28, February.
  9. Asiedu, Elizabeth & Jin, Yi & Nandwa, Boaz, 2009. "Does foreign aid mitigate the adverse effect of expropriation risk on foreign direct investment?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(2), pages 268-275, July.
  10. Ann Harrison, 2007. "Globalization and Poverty," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number harr06-1, June.
  11. Anirudh Krishna, 2010. "Who became poor, who escaped poverty, and why? Developing and using a retrospective methodology in five countries," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(2), pages 351-372.
  12. Jorge Balat & Irene Brambilla & Guido Porto, 2007. "Realizing the Gains From Trade: Export Crops, Marketing Costs, and Poverty," NBER Working Papers 13395, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Silva, Ester G. & Teixeira, Aurora A.C., 2008. "Surveying structural change: Seminal contributions and a bibliometric account," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 273-300, December.
  14. Sandra Silva & Aurora Teixeira, 2009. "On the divergence of evolutionary research paths in the past 50 years: a comprehensive bibliometric account," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 19(5), pages 605-642, October.
  15. Christian Keuschnigg & Evelyn Ribi, 2008. "Outsourcing, Unemployment and Welfare Policy," CESifo Working Paper Series 2452, CESifo Group Munich.
  16. Kim, Se-Jik & Kim, Yong Jin, 2000. "Growth gains from trade and education," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 519-545, April.
  17. Andrea Brandolini & Silvia Magri & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2010. "Asset-based measurement of poverty," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 755, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  18. Porto, Guido G., 2006. "Using survey data to assess the distributional effects of trade policy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 140-160, September.
  19. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Esther Duflo, 2007. "The Economic Lives of the Poor," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(1), pages 141-168, Winter.
  20. Marcos Chamon & Michael Kremer, 2006. "Economic Transformation, Population Growth and the Long-Run World Income Distribution," NBER Working Papers 12038, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  21. Carlos Farinha Rodrigues & Isabel Andrade, 2010. "Monetary Poverty, Material Deprivation and Consistent Poverty in Portugal," Working Papers Department of Economics 2010/25, ISEG - School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, University of Lisbon.
  22. Ehrlich, Paul R., 2008. "Key issues for attention from ecological economists," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(01), pages 1-20, February.
  23. Edmonds, Eric V. & Pavcnik, Nina, 2006. "Trade liberalization and the allocation of labor between households and markets in a poor country," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 272-295, July.
  24. Porto, Guido G., 2005. "Informal export barriers and poverty," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 447-470, July.
  25. Brett-Crowther, M. R., 1983. "Poverty and famines an essay on entitlement and deprivation : Amartya Sen Clarendon Press/Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1981, 257 pp. [UK pound]8.95," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 94-95, February.
  26. Krugman, Paul & Elizondo, Raul Livas, 1996. "Trade policy and the Third World metropolis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 137-150, April.
  27. Chris Papageorgiou & Andreas Savvides & Marios Zachariadis, 2005. "International Medical Technology Diffusion," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 2-2005, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
  28. Feenstra, Robert C. & Rose, Andrew K., 2000. "The Journal of International Economics at Fifty: A Retrospective1," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 3-15, February.
  29. Rutherford, Thomas F. & Tarr, David G., 2008. "Poverty effects of Russia's WTO accession: Modeling "real" households with endogenous productivity effects," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 131-150, May.
  30. De Zeeuw, Aart, 2008. "‘Key issues for attention from ecological economists’: a comment," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(01), pages 21-24, February.
  31. Sen, Amartya, 1983. "Poverty and Famines: An Essay on Entitlement and Deprivation," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198284635, May.
  32. Harrison, Ann E. & McMillan, Margaret S., 2003. "Does direct foreign investment affect domestic credit constraints?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 73-100, October.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:por:fepwps:425. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ()

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.