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Key issues for attention from ecological economists

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  • EHRLICH, PAUL R.

Abstract

This paper gives an ecologist's overview of the deteriorating environmental situation. It then describes areas where the activities of ecological economists seem appropriate (e.g., ecosystem service valuation, trade) and others requiring more attention (e.g., definitions of utility, social discounting, preserving population diversity, global toxification, the epidemiological environment, overpopulation, overconsumption, the economic impacts of nuclear explosions, and the equilibration of opportunity costs when attempting to solve global dilemmas). A general problem is the failure of ecological economists adequately to communicate their results and concerns to the general public and to decision makers. In view of the demonstrable failure of traditional economics to focus its attention on what will be the central issues of the twenty-first century, it is clear that ecological economics is in a position to become the central subdiscipline of economics. In order to do so, it is important for ecological economists to always keep the ‘big picture’ in view.

Suggested Citation

  • Ehrlich, Paul R., 2008. "Key issues for attention from ecological economists," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(01), pages 1-20, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:13:y:2008:i:01:p:1-20_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Luis Carvalho & Aurora A.C. Teixeira, 2011. "Where are the poor in International Economics?," FEP Working Papers 425, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    2. Castro e Silva, Manuela & Teixeira, Aurora A.C., 2011. "A bibliometric account of the evolution of EE in the last two decades: Is ecological economics (becoming) a post-normal science?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(5), pages 849-862, March.
    3. Clive L. Spash, 2012. "Ecological Economics and Philosophy of Science: Ontology, Epistemology, Methodology and Ideology," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2012_03, Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    4. Dasgupta, Partha, 2010. "The Place of Nature in Economic Development," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    5. Spash, Clive L., 2013. "The shallow or the deep ecological economics movement?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 351-362.
    6. Perrings, Charles, 2014. "Environment and development economics 20 years on," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 19(03), pages 333-366, June.
    7. Paul R. Ehrlich & Anne H. Ehrlich, 2016. "Population, Resources, and the Faith-Based Economy: the Situation in 2016," Biophysical Economics and Resource Quality, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 1-9, August.
    8. Spash, Clive L., 2012. "New foundations for ecological economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 36-47.
    9. Paul Ehrlich, 2011. "A personal view: environmental education—its content and delivery," Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Springer;Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences, vol. 1(1), pages 6-13, March.

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