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Returns to Controlling a Neglected Tropical Disease: Schistosomiasis Control Program and Education Outcomes in Nigeria

Author

Listed:
  • Francis Makamu

    () (Oklahoma State University)

  • Mehtabul Azam

    () (Oklahoma State University)

  • Harounan Kazianga

    () (Oklahoma State University)

Abstract

Using the rollout of the schistosomiasis campaign in Nigeria as a quasi-experiment, we examine the impact of the disease control program on school age children education outcomes. Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by infections from a small worm. Its most severe effects hamper growth and cognitive development of children. The mass campaign targeted four states that saw large reduction in the infectious disease afterwards. Using difference-in-differences strategy, we find that the cohort exposed to the treatment in rural areas accumulated an additional 0.6 years of education compared to cohort not exposed to the treatment. Moreover, the impact of the schistosomiasis treatment is mainly on girls residing in rural areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Francis Makamu & Mehtabul Azam & Harounan Kazianga, 2017. "Returns to Controlling a Neglected Tropical Disease: Schistosomiasis Control Program and Education Outcomes in Nigeria," Economics Working Paper Series 1711, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:okl:wpaper:1711
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    File URL: https://business.okstate.edu/site-files/docs/ecls-working-papers/OKSWPS1711.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Schistosomiasis; Disease Control; Child Education; Nigeria.;

    JEL classification:

    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education

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