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Pensions, Savings and Housing: A Life-cycle Framework with Policy Simulations

Author

Listed:
  • John Creedy
  • Norman Gemmell
  • Grant Scobie

    () (The Treasury
    The Treasury)

Abstract

The objective of the paper is to explore the saving and consumption responses of a representative household to a range of policy interventions such as changes in taxes and pension settings. To achieve this, it develops a two-period life-cycle model. The representative household maximises lifetime utility through its choice of optimal levels of consumption, housing and saving. A key feature of the approach is modelling the consumption of housing services as a separate good in retirement along with the implications for saving. Importantly, the model incorporates a government budget constraint involving a pay-as-you-go universal pension. In addition, the model allows for a compulsory private retirement savings scheme. Particular attention in the simulations is given to the potential impact on household saving rates of a range of policy changes. Typically the effect on saving rates is modest. In most instances, it would take very substantial changes in existing policy settings to induce significant increases in household saving rates.

Suggested Citation

  • John Creedy & Norman Gemmell & Grant Scobie, 2014. "Pensions, Savings and Housing: A Life-cycle Framework with Policy Simulations," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/14, New Zealand Treasury.
  • Handle: RePEc:nzt:nztwps:14/14
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    File URL: https://treasury.govt.nz/sites/default/files/2014-10/wp-14-14.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Creedy, John & Gemmell, Norman & Scobie, Grant, 2015. "Pensions, savings and housing: A life-cycle framework with policy simulations," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 346-357.
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    Cited by:

    1. Creedy, John & Gemmell, Norman & Scobie, Grant, 2015. "Pensions, savings and housing: A life-cycle framework with policy simulations," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 346-357.
    2. Day, Creina & Guest, Ross, 2016. "Fertility and female wages: A new link via house prices," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 121-132.
    3. van de Ven, Justin, 2017. "SIDD: An adaptable framework for analysing the distributional implications of policy alternatives where savings and employment decisions matter," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 161-174.
    4. Wang, Hong & Koo, Bonsoo & O'Hare, Colin, 2016. "Retirement planning in the light of changing demographics," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 749-763.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Savings; Housing; Retirement; Intertemporal elasticity of substitution; rate of interest; taxation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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