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Student progression in upper secondary education: The effect of academic ability, gender, and schools

  • Torberg Falch

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Bjarne Stroem

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

This paper studies how students’ prior academic ability, gender, and family background affect performance in upper secondary schools in terms of lack of progression and dropout probability. The link between dropout and lack of progression in post-compulsory schooling is important as graduating from upper secondary school is a prerequisite to attend universities and other higher education institutions. Using an extremely rich data set from Norway covering all students starting upper secondary school education in the fall 2002, we find that earlier school performance is the main predictor of dropout and lack of progression. This holds controlling for a number of family background variables, study tracks and a full set of school fixed effects.

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File URL: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/iso/WP/2008/6StudentDropoutFromSecondarySchools_3.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology in its series Working Paper Series with number 9708.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: 05 Dec 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nst:samfok:9708
Contact details of provider: Postal: 7491 Trondheim
Phone: 73 59 19 40
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Web page: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/iso/WP/wp.htm
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  1. Ted O'Donoghue and Matthew Rabin ., 1997. "Doing It Now or Later," Economics Working Papers 97-253, University of California at Berkeley.
  2. Zvi Eckstein & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 1999. "Why Youths Drop Out of High School: The Impact of Preferences, Opportunities, and Abilities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(6), pages 1295-1340, November.
  3. Dan A. Black & Terra G. McKinnish & Seth G. Sanders, 2005. "Tight labor markets and the demand for education: Evidence from the coal boom and bust," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 59(1), pages 3-16, October.
  4. Oreopoulos, Philip, 2007. "Do dropouts drop out too soon? Wealth, health and happiness from compulsory schooling," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(11-12), pages 2213-2229, December.
  5. Patricia Rice, 1999. "The impact of local labour markets on investment in further education: Evidence from the England and Wales youth cohort studies," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 287-312.
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