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Post-secondary School Type and Academic Achievement

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Listed:
  • Elena Meschi
  • Anna Vignoles
  • Robert Cassen

Abstract

type="main"> The Further Education (FE) sector has been the Cinderella of English education, attracting less research, despite the large number of students who attend FE colleges. We ask whether the post-16 institution attended by the pupil, i.e. FE college or school-based provision, influences pupils' final achievement and whether the gain in pupil achievement at A level is greater in FE colleges as compared with school-based provision. Allowing for the fact that FE colleges admit more disadvantaged pupils, those who attend an FE college do marginally less well at A level. Sixth form colleges have significantly higher value-added, particularly for higher achieving pupils.

Suggested Citation

  • Elena Meschi & Anna Vignoles & Robert Cassen, 2014. "Post-secondary School Type and Academic Achievement," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 82(2), pages 183-201, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:82:y:2014:i:2:p:183-201
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/manc.12006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Steven Mcintosh, 2006. "Further Analysis of the Returns to Academic and Vocational Qualifications," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(2), pages 225-251, April.
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    5. Kingdon, Geeta & Cassen, Robert, 2007. "Understanding low achievement in English schools," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6222, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Micklewright, John, 1989. "Choice at Sixteen," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 56(221), pages 25-39, February.
    7. Erik Hanushek & F. Welch (ed.), 2006. "Handbook of the Economics of Education," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier, edition 1, volume 1, number 1, June.
    8. Erik Hanushek & F. Welch (ed.), 2006. "Handbook of the Economics of Education," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier, edition 1, volume 2, number 2, June.
    9. repec:cep:sticas:/118 is not listed on IDEAS
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