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Managing capital flows: The case of India

Author

Listed:
  • Shah, Ajay

    () (National Institute of Public Finance and Policy)

  • Patnaik, Ila

    () (National Institute of Public Finance and Policy)

Abstract

From the early 1990s, India embarked on easing capital controls. Liberalization emphasised openness towards equity flows, both FDI and portfolio flows. In particular, there are few barriers in the face of portfolio equity flows. In recent years, a massive increase in the value of foreign ownership of Indian equities has come about, largely reflecting improvements in the size, liquidity and corporate governance of Indian firms. While the system of capital controls appears formidable, the de facto openness on the ground is greater than is apparent, particularly because of the substantial enlargement of the current account. These changes to capital account openness were not accompanied by commensurate monetary policy reform. The monetary policy regime has consisted essentially of a pegged exchange rate to the US dollar throughout. Increasing openness on the capital account, coupled with exchange rate pegging, has led to a substantial loss of monetary policy autonomy. The logical way forward now consists of bringing the de jure capital controls uptodate with the de facto convertibility, and embarking on reforms of the monetary policy framework so as to shift the focus of monetary policy away from the exchange rate to domestic inflation.

Suggested Citation

  • Shah, Ajay & Patnaik, Ila, 2008. "Managing capital flows: The case of India," Working Papers 08/52, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:npf:wpaper:08/52
    Note: Working Paper 52, 2008
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chinn, Menzie D. & Ito, Hiro, 2006. "What matters for financial development? Capital controls, institutions, and interactions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 163-192, October.
    2. Ajay Shah, 2008. "New issues in Indian macro policy," Working Papers id:1478, eSocialSciences.
    3. Poonam Gupta & James P. F. Gordon, 2004. "Nonresident Deposits in India; In Search of Return?," IMF Working Papers 04/48, International Monetary Fund.
    4. René M. Stulz, 2007. "The Limits of Financial Globalization," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 19(1), pages 8-15.
    5. Manmohan Singh, 2007. "Use of Participatory Notes in Indian Equity Markets and Recent Regulatory Changes," IMF Working Papers 07/291, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Ajay Shah & Ila Patnaik, 2007. "India's Experience with Capital Flows: The Elusive Quest for a Sustainable Current Account Deficit," NBER Chapters,in: Capital Controls and Capital Flows in Emerging Economies: Policies, Practices and Consequences, pages 609-644 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Eswar S. Prasad, 2009. "India’s Approach to Capital Account Liberalization," Working Papers id:2043, eSocialSciences.
    2. Prasad, Eswar S., 2009. "Some New Perspectives on India’s Approach to Capital Account Liberalization," India Policy Forum, National Council of Applied Economic Research, vol. 5(1), pages 125-178.
    3. Sayantan Bandhu Majumder & Ranjanendra Narayan Nag, 2016. "Understanding the Behaviour of Capital Flow and its Components: The Indian Experience," Margin: The Journal of Applied Economic Research, National Council of Applied Economic Research, vol. 10(3), pages 355-380, August.
    4. Sarno, Lucio & Tsiakas, Ilias & Ulloa, Barbara, 2016. "What drives international portfolio flows?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 53-72.
    5. Ma, Guonan & McCauley, Robert N., 2013. "Is China or India more financially open?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 6-27.
    6. Prasad, Eswar, 2009. "India's Approach to Capital Account Liberalization," IZA Discussion Papers 3927, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Kodongo, Odongo & Ojah, Kalu, 2013. "Real exchange rates, trade balance and capital flows in Africa," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 22-46.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International investment ; Long term capital movements ; International lending and debt problems ; Monetary systems;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F34 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Lending and Debt Problems
    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System

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