IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Managing Capital Flows: The Case of India

  • Ajay Shah

    ()

  • Ila Patnaik

    ()

From the early 1990s, India embarked on easing capital controls. Liberalization emphasised openness towards equity flows, both FDI and portfolio flows. In particular, there are few barriers in the face of portfolio equity flows. In recent years, a massive increase in the value of foreign ownership of Indian equities has come about, largely reflecting improvements in the size, liquidity and corporate governance of Indian frms. While the system of capital controls appears formidable, the de facto openness on the ground is greater than is apparent, particularly because of the substantial enlargement of the current account. These changes to capital account openness were not accompanied by commensurate monetary policy reform. The monetary policy regime has consisted essentially of a pegged exchange rate to the US dollar throughout. [WP No. 2008-52]

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.esocialsciences.org/Download/repecDownload.aspx?fname=Document12472008380.4697077.pdf&fcategory=Articles&AId=1570&fref=repec
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:1570.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: Jul 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:1570
Note: Institutional Papers
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.esocialsciences.org

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Ajay Shah & Ila Patnaik, 2005. "India's Experience with Capital Flows: The Elusive Quest for a Sustainable Current Account Deficit," NBER Working Papers 11387, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Chinn, Menzie David & Ito, Hiro, 2005. "What Matters for Financial Development? Capital Controls, Institutions, and Interactions," Santa Cruz Center for International Economics, Working Paper Series qt5pv1j341, Center for International Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  3. Poonam Gupta & James P. F. Gordon, 2004. "Nonresident Deposits in India; In Search of Return?," IMF Working Papers 04/48, International Monetary Fund.
  4. Jeffrey A. Frankel & Shang-Jin Wei, 1994. "Yen Bloc or Dollar Bloc? Exchange Rate Policies of the East Asian Economies," NBER Chapters, in: Macroeconomic Linkage: Savings, Exchange Rates, and Capital Flows, NBER-EASE Volume 3, pages 295-333 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Sergio L. Schmukler & Stijn Claessens, 2007. "International Financial Integration Through Equity Markets; Which Firms From Which Countries Go Global?," IMF Working Papers 07/138, International Monetary Fund.
  6. Ajay Shah, 2008. "New issues in Indian macro policy," Working Papers id:1478, eSocialSciences.
  7. Manmohan Singh, 2007. "Use of Participatory Notes in Indian Equity Markets and Recent Regulatory Changes," IMF Working Papers 07/291, International Monetary Fund.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:1570. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Padma Prakash)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.