IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Global Value Chains and Market Formation Process in Emerging Export Activity: Evidence from Ethiopian Flower Industry


  • Mulu Gebreeyesus

    (United Nations University Maastricht Economic and Social Research and Training Centre on Innovation and Technology)

  • Tetsushi Sonobe

    (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies)


This paper provides a case study of the Ethiopian flower export industry which successfully emerged at time when the EU market (main destination) was already characterized by increasingly stringent standards and delivery requirements. Entering this market required a multitude of capabilities at firm, sector and national levels. Several of these capabilities were absent or weak in the domestic market when the new activity kicked off. The paper analyzes how the capabilities of individual firms and the industry at large co-evolved and the role of various actors in the ‘market formation’ process.

Suggested Citation

  • Mulu Gebreeyesus & Tetsushi Sonobe, 2011. "Global Value Chains and Market Formation Process in Emerging Export Activity: Evidence from Ethiopian Flower Industry," GRIPS Discussion Papers 11-13, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ngi:dpaper:11-13

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hall, Andy & Mytelka, Lynn & Oyelaran-Oyeyinka, Banji, 2006. "Concepts and guidelines for diagnostic assessments of agricultural innovation capacity," MERIT Working Papers 017, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Wijnands, Jo H.M. & van der Lans, Karin & Hobbs, Jill E., 2006. "International Flower Networks: Transparency and Risks in Marketing Channel Choice," 99th Seminar, February 8-10, 2006, Bonn, Germany 7759, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Gebreeyesus, Mulu & Iizuka, Michiko, 2010. "Discovery of the flower industry in Ethiopia: experimentation and coordination," MERIT Working Papers 025, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    4. Bergek, Anna & Jacobsson, Staffan & Carlsson, Bo & Lindmark, Sven & Rickne, Annika, 2008. "Analyzing the functional dynamics of technological innovation systems: A scheme of analysis," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 407-429, April.
    5. Humphreys, David, 2008. "World Investment Report: Transnational Corporations, Extractive Industries and Development, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), Geneva, (2007). 323 pp., $90 (developed countri," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 175-177, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Girma, Jony & Gardebroek, Cornelis, 2015. "The impact of contracts on organic honey producers' incomes in southwestern Ethiopia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 259-268.
    2. Vajk Lukacs de Pereny Martens & Ronnie Ramlogan, 2015. "Standardization and Governance Dynamics in the Peruvian Alpaca Fibre Value Chain," Globelics Working Paper Series 2015-10, Globelics - Global Network for Economics of Learning, Innovation, and Competence Building Systems, Aalborg University, Department of Business and Management.
    3. Mulu Gebreeyesus, 2015. "Firm adoption of international standards: evidence from the Ethiopian floriculture sector," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 46(S1), pages 139-155, November.

    More about this item


    Africa; Ethiopia; global value chain; market formation; cut-flower industry;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ngi:dpaper:11-13. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.