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Discovery of Flower Industry in Ethiopia: Experimentation and Coordination

Author

Listed:
  • Gebreeyesus Mulu

    (United Nations University (UNU-MERIT))

  • Iizuka Michiko

    (United Nations University (UNU-MERIT))

Abstract

This paper examines the discovery process of a recent and extremely successful non-traditional export activity, namely, the Ethiopian flower industry. This industry emerged as a result of entrepreneurial experimentation, whereby private entrepreneurs formed an 'advocacy coalition' to address uncertainties and coordination problems during the start-up phases. As a result of their lobbying, the Ethiopian government launched a strategic coordination with the industry, identifying key areas for intervention and setting a five-year target for the sector's development. This study highlights the importance of a shared vision and good relations between the government and private sector for development of this new industry.

Suggested Citation

  • Gebreeyesus Mulu & Iizuka Michiko, 2012. "Discovery of Flower Industry in Ethiopia: Experimentation and Coordination," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 2(2), pages 1-27, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:globdv:v:2:y:2012:i:2:n:5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cities: Where the economy plays scrabble
      by Brad Cunningham in The Avenue on 2017-07-07 02:15:41

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    Cited by:

    1. Mulu Gebreeyesus, 2015. "Firm adoption of international standards: evidence from the Ethiopian floriculture sector," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 46(S1), pages 139-155, November.
    2. Mulu Gebreeyesus, 2017. "Industries without smokestacks: Implications for Ethiopia's industrialization," WIDER Working Paper Series 014, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Tigist Mekonnen Melesse, 2015. "Agricultural Technology Adoption and Market Participation under Learning Externality: Impact Evaluation on Small-scale Agriculture from Rural Ethiopia," Working Papers 2015/06, Maastricht School of Management.
    4. Mekonnen, Tigist, 2017. "Financing rural households and its impact: Evidence from randomized field experiment data," MERIT Working Papers 009, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    5. Mekonnen, Tigist, 2017. "Impact of agricultural technology adoption on market participation in the rural social network system," MERIT Working Papers 008, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    6. Tigabu D. Getahun & Espen Villanger, 2015. "Labor-intensive jobs for women and development: Intrahousehold welfare effects and its transmission channels," CMI Working Papers 15, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.

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