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Prices of High-Tech Products, Mismeasurement, and Pace of Innovation

Listed author(s):
  • David Byrne
  • Stephen Oliner
  • Daniel Sichel

Two recent papers have made compelling cases that mismeasurement of prices of high tech products cannot explain the slow pace of labor productivity growth that has prevailed since the mid-2000s. Does that result indicate that mismeasurement of high-tech products has limited implications for patterns of economic growth? The answer in this paper is “no.” We demonstrate that the understatement of price declines for high-tech products in official measures has a dramatic effect on the pattern of MFP growth across sectors. In particular, we show that correcting this mismeasurement implies faster MFP growth in high-tech sectors and slower MFP advance outside the high-tech sector. If MFP growth is taken as a rough proxy for the pace of innovation, our results suggest that innovation in the tech sector has been more rapid than the rate that would be inferred from official statistics (and less rapid outside high-tech). These results deepen the productivity puzzle. If the pace of innovation in high-tech sectors has been more rapid than indicated by official statistics, then it is perhaps even more puzzling that overall labor productivity growth has been so sluggish in recent years.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 23369.

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Date of creation: Apr 2017
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23369
Note: DAE EFG PR
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  1. David M. Byrne, 2015. "Domestic Electronics Manufacturing : Medical, Military, and Aerospace Equipment and What We Don't Know about High-Tech Productivity," FEDS Notes 2015-06-02, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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