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ENTICE-BR: The Effects of Backstop Technology R&D on Climate Policy Models

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  • David Popp

Abstract

Recent attempts to endogenize technology in climate policy models have produced mixed results. Models including alternative technologies find large gains from induced technological change. However, technological progress in these models comes through learning-by-doing, which ignores the potential opportunity costs of technological change. Models using R&D spending as the driver of technological change address this. However, these models typically include only a single representative energy technology, substitution across technologies is not possible. This paper addresses these shortcomings by including policy-induced energy R&D in a model with a backstop energy technology. I show that, while induced technological change is important, larger welfare gains come from simply adding an alternative technology to the model. As in models with a single technology, opportunity costs of research limit the role induced innovation can play. Moreover, since the backstop technology improves welfare even without climate policy, accurate policy analysis depends on a carefully constructed baseline simulation.

Suggested Citation

  • David Popp, 2004. "ENTICE-BR: The Effects of Backstop Technology R&D on Climate Policy Models," NBER Working Papers 10285, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:10285
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jérémy Laurent-Lucchetti & Andrew Leach, 2006. "Induced innovation in a decentralized model of climate change," Cahiers de recherche 06-02, HEC Montréal, Institut d'économie appliquée.
    2. Otto, Vincent M. & Reilly, John, 2008. "Directed technical change and the adoption of CO2 abatement technology: The case of CO2 capture and storage," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 2879-2898, November.
    3. Marzio Galeotti & Carlo Carraro, 2004. "Does Endogenous Technical Change Make a Difference in Climate Policy Analysis? A Robustness Exercise with the FEEM-RICE Model," Working Papers 2004.152, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    4. Baker, Erin & Shittu, Ekundayo, 2006. "Profit-maximizing R&D in response to a random carbon tax," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 160-180, May.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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