IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

Residential Parking in Vibrant City Districts

  • Inga Molenda


    (Institute of Transport Economics, Muenster)

  • Gernot Sieg


    (Institute of Transport Economics, Muenster)

Living downtown has advantages because it allows for a convenient access to a variety of shopping and leisure activities as well as disadvantages due to the difficulties in finding a parking spot when parking capacity is scarce. We formally model the trade-off in a vibrant city district between parking privileges for residents and economic vitality in terms of the product variety offered. We identify situations in which assigning on-street parking spaces to residential parking is a welfare-maximizing policy. Furthermore, we analyze the optimal share of residential parking spaces from the residents perspective only and find that it exceeds the welfare-maximizing share.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
File Function: First version, 2013
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Institute of Transport Economics, University of Muenster in its series Working Papers with number 18.

in new window

Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: Forthcoming in Economics of Transportation
Handle: RePEc:mut:wpaper:18
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Universitätsstr. 14-16, 48143 Münster

Phone: 02 51 / 83-2 29 10
Fax: 02 51 / 83-2 83 99
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Calthrop, Edward & Proost, Stef, 2006. "Regulating on-street parking," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 29-48, January.
  2. Richard Arnott & John Rowse, 2007. "Downtown Parking in Auto City," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 665, Boston College Department of Economics.
  3. Ben Still & David Simmonds, 2000. "Parking restraint policy and urban vitality," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 291-316, January.
  4. van Ommeren, Jos & de Groote, Jesper & Mingardo, Giuliano, 2014. "Residential parking permits and parking supply," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 33-44.
  5. Shoup, Donald C., 1999. "The trouble with minimum parking requirements," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 33(7-8), pages 549-574.
  6. Richard Arnott & Eren Inci, 2005. "An Integrated Model of Downtown Parking and Traffic Congestion," NBER Working Papers 11118, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. repec:ucp:bkecon:9781884829987 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Arnott, Richard & Rowse, John, 1999. "Modeling Parking," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 97-124, January.
  9. Glazer, Amihai & Niskanen, Esko, 1992. "Parking fees and congestion," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 123-132, March.
  10. van Ommeren, Jos & Wentink, Derk & Dekkers, Jasper, 2011. "The real price of parking policy," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 25-31, July.
  11. Anderson, Simon P. & de Palma, Andre, 2004. "The economics of pricing parking," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 1-20, January.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mut:wpaper:18. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Birgit Rueschenschmidt)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.