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Rupture conventionnelle, destructions d'emplois et licenciements : une analyse empirique sur données d'entreprises (2006-2009)




In 2008, a new legal termination of long-term contract (CDI) called “the rupture conventionnelle” was enacted. The aim of this article is first to analyze the impact of this new termination on the employers' fire decisions and then to provide empirical evidence of a substitution between the “rupture conventionnelle” and other terminations. Using two matched firms' datasets, one from workers'movement data (EMMO-DMMO) and another from accounting data (EAE), our database includes a firms' sample over four consecutive years from 2006 to 2009. We use the difference-in-differences method combined with a propensity score matching to control selection bias and thus to create two similar firms' groups: those that used the “rupture conventionnelle” and those not. Our main results indicate that the introduction of the “rupture conventionnelle” in crisis times tends to increase workforce exits and many more job destruction. However, we do not find any evidence of a substitution between the RC and the firing for personal reasons, which have become more expensive and riskier

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  • Camille Signoretto, 2013. "Rupture conventionnelle, destructions d'emplois et licenciements : une analyse empirique sur données d'entreprises (2006-2009)," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 13069, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  • Handle: RePEc:mse:cesdoc:13069

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bertola, Giuseppe, 1990. "Job security, employment and wages," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 851-879, June.
    2. Thomas K. Bauer & Stefan Bender & Holger Bonin, 2007. "Dismissal Protection and Worker Flows in Small Establishments," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(296), pages 804-821, November.
    3. Bentolila, S. & Saint-Paul, G., 1995. "A model of labour demand with linear adjustment costs," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 105-105, March.
    4. Richard Duhautois, 2002. "Les réallocations d'emplois en France sont-elles en phase avec le cycle ?," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 351(1), pages 87-103.
    5. Samuel Bentolila & Giuseppe Bertola, 1990. "Firing Costs and Labour Demand: How Bad is Eurosclerosis?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(3), pages 381-402.
    6. David H. Autor, 2003. "Outsourcing at Will: The Contribution of Unjust Dismissal Doctrine to the Growth of Employment Outsourcing," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-42, January.
    7. Davis, Steven J. & Haltiwanger, John, 1999. "Gross job flows," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 41, pages 2711-2805 Elsevier.
    8. David H. Autor & John J. Donohue & Stewart J. Schwab, 2006. "The Costs of Wrongful-Discharge Laws," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(2), pages 211-231, May.
    9. Burgert, Derik, 2005. "The Impact of German Job Protection Legislation on Job Creation in Small Establishments - An Application of the Regression Discontinuity Design," MPRA Paper 5971, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. David H. Autor & William R. Kerr & Adriana D. Kugler, 2007. "Does Employment Protection Reduce Productivity? Evidence From US States," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(521), pages 189-217, June.
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    More about this item


    Employment protection; rupture conventionnelle; firing; job destruction; firm database; difference-in-differences; propensity score matching;

    JEL classification:

    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis
    • K31 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Labor Law
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models

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