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The Connection between Wall Street and Main Street: Measurement and Implications for Monetary Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Alessandro Barattieri
  • Maya Eden
  • Dalibor Stevanovic

Abstract

We propose a measure of the extent to which a financial sector is connected to the real economy. The Measure of Connectedness is a mesure of composition of the assets, namely the share of the credit to the non-financial sectors over the total credit market instruments. The aggregate U.S. Measure of Connectedness declines by about 27% in the period 1952-2009. We suggest that this increase in disconnectedness between the financial sector and the real economy may have dampened the sensitivity of the real economy to monetary shocks. We present a stylized model that illustrates how interbank trading can reduce the sensitivity of lending to the entrepreneur’s net worth, thereby dampening the credit channel transmission of monetary policy. Finally, we interact our measure with both a SVAR and a FAVAR for the U.S. economy, and establish that the impulse responses to monetary policy shocks are dampened as the level of connection declines.

Suggested Citation

  • Alessandro Barattieri & Maya Eden & Dalibor Stevanovic, 2013. "The Connection between Wall Street and Main Street: Measurement and Implications for Monetary Policy," Cahiers de recherche 1331, CIRPEE.
  • Handle: RePEc:lvl:lacicr:1331
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Thomas Philippon & Ariell Reshef, 2009. "Wages and Human Capital in the U.S. Financial Industry: 1909-2006," NBER Working Papers 14644, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    5. Boivin, Jean & Kiley, Michael T. & Mishkin, Frederic S., 2010. "How Has the Monetary Transmission Mechanism Evolved Over Time?," Handbook of Monetary Economics,in: Benjamin M. Friedman & Michael Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 8, pages 369-422 Elsevier.
    6. Borio, Claudio & Zhu, Haibin, 2012. "Capital regulation, risk-taking and monetary policy: A missing link in the transmission mechanism?," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 236-251.
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    13. repec:pri:cepsud:237b%20shin is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Jean-Stéphane Mésonnier & Dalibor Stevanovic, 2012. "Bank Leverage Shocks and the Macroeconomy: a New Look in a Data-Rich Environment," CIRANO Working Papers 2012s-23, CIRANO.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Connection; financial sector; real economy; monetary policy transmission mechanism;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General

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