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Gender and Modern Supply Chains in Developing Countries

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  • Miet Maaertens
  • Johan F.M. Swinnen

Abstract

The rapid spread of modern supply chains in developing countries is profoundly changing the way food is produced and traded. In this paper we examine the gender implications in modern supply chains. We conceptualize the various mechanisms through which women are directly affected, we review existing empirical evidence and add new survey-based evidence. Empirical findings from our own survey suggest that modern supply chains may be associated with reduced gender inequalities in rural areas. We find that women benefit more and more directly from large-scale estate production and agro-industrial processing, and the creation of employment in these modern agro-industries than from smallholder contract-farming.

Suggested Citation

  • Miet Maaertens & Johan F.M. Swinnen, 2009. "Gender and Modern Supply Chains in Developing Countries," LICOS Discussion Papers 23109, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
  • Handle: RePEc:lic:licosd:23109
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    File URL: http://www.econ.kuleuven.be/licos/publications/dp/dp231.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Barrientos, Stephanie & Dolan, Catherine & Tallontire, Anne, 2003. "A Gendered Value Chain Approach to Codes of Conduct in African Horticulture," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(9), pages 1511-1526, September.
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    4. Birthal, Pratap S. & Joshi, P. K. & Gulati, Ashok, 2005. "Vertical coordination in high-value commodities," MTID discussion papers 85, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Porter, Gina & Phillips-Howard[malt], Kevin, 1997. "Comparing contracts: An evaluation of contract farming schemes in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 227-238, February.
    6. Barron, Maria Antonieta & Rello, Fernando, 2000. "The impact of the tomato agroindustry on the rural poor in Mexico," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 23(3), pages 289-297, September.
    7. Barron, Maria Antonieta & Rello, Fernando, 2000. "The impact of the tomato agroindustry on the rural poor in Mexico," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 23(3), September.
    8. Maertens, Miet & Swinnen, Johan F.M., 2009. "Trade, Standards, and Poverty: Evidence from Senegal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 161-178, January.
    9. Daniela Casale, 2004. "What has the Feminisation of the Labour Market ‘Bought’ Women in South Africa? Trends in Labour Force Participation, Employment and Earnings, 1995-2001," Working Papers 04084, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    10. Miet Maertens & Liesbeth Colen & Johan F. M. Swinnen, 2011. "Globalisation and poverty in Senegal: a worst case scenario?," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 38(1), pages 31-54, March.
    11. Stephanie Barrientos & Andrienetta Kritzinger, 2004. "Squaring the circle: global production and the informalization of work in South African fruit exports," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 81-92.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Maertens, Miet & Swinnen, Johan, 2015. "Agricultural trade and development: A value chain perspective," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2015-04, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    2. Chakrabarti, Sanjukta & Sarker, Debnarayan, 2011. "Gender Earning Differentials in Flower Trading Market in West Bengal: Capital Constraints on Women’s Income," Indian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Indian Society of Agricultural Economics, vol. 66(2).
    3. Goedele Van den Broeck & Kaat Van Hoyweghen & Miet Maertens, 2016. "Employment Conditions in the Senegalese Horticultural Export Industry: A Worker Perspective," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 34(2), pages 301-319, March.
    4. Maertens, Miet & Verhofstadt, Ellen, 2013. "Horticultural exports, female wage employment and primary school enrolment: Theory and evidence from Senegal," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 118-131.
    5. L. Alan Winters & Antonio Martuscelli, 2014. "Trade Liberalization and Poverty: What Have We Learned in a Decade?," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 6(1), pages 493-512, October.
    6. repec:eee:wdevel:v:102:y:2018:i:c:p:195-212 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. VAN DEN BROECK, Goedele & MAERTENS, Miet, 2016. "Moving Up or Moving Out? Insights on Rural Development and Poverty Reduction in Senegal," Working Papers 242367, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.
    8. Cazzuffi, Chiara & Pereira-López, Mariana & Soloaga, Isidro, 2017. "Local poverty reduction in Chile and Mexico: The role of food manufacturing growth," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 160-185.
    9. Madrigal, Lucia & Torero, Maximo, 2016. "Using quantitative tools to measure gender differences within value chains," IFPRI book chapters,in: Innovation for inclusive value-chain development: Successes and challenges, chapter 14, pages 441-464 International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Cecilia Navarra, 2018. "Contract farming in Mozambique. Implications on gender inequalities within and across rural households," WIDER Working Paper Series 026, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    11. repec:oup:jecgeo:v:18:y:2018:i:1:p:111-137. is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Sarker, Debnarayan & Chakraborty, Sanjukta, 2011. "Market integration, competitiveness and efficiency in urban vs. rural markets: male and female flower trading farms in West Bengal," MPRA Paper 33700, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Devaux, André & Torero, Maximo & Donovan, Jason & Horton, Douglas E. (ed.), 2016. "Innovation for inclusive value-chain development: Successes and challenges," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 978-0-89629-213-0, September.
    14. Chiputwa, Brian & Qaim, Matin, 2014. "Sustainability standards, gender, and nutrition among smallholder farmers in Uganda," Discussion Papers 191001, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    15. Swinnen Johan & Vandeplas Anneleen, 2012. "Rich Consumers and Poor Producers: Quality and Rent Distribution in Global Value Chains," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 2(2), pages 1-30, January.
    16. Johan Swinnen, 2014. "Global Agricultural Value Chains, Standards, and Development," RSCAS Working Papers 2014/30, European University Institute.
    17. Van den Broeck, Goedele & Maertens, Miet, 2014. "Does female employment reduce fertility rates? Evidence from the Senegalese horticultural export sector," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182715, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    18. Lambrecht, Isabel & Schuster, Monica & Asare, Sarah & Pelleriaux, Laura, 2017. "Changing gender roles in agriculture?: Evidence from 20 years of data in Ghana," IFPRI discussion papers 1623, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    19. Kouser, Shahzad & Qaim, Matin & Abedullah, 2015. "Bt cotton and employment effects for female agricultural laborers in Pakistan: An application of double-hurdle model," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212014, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    20. VAN DEN BROECK, Goedele & MAERTENS, Miet, 2015. "Does Off-farm Employment Make Women in Rural Senegal Happy?," Working Papers 232593, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.
    21. Krumbiegel, Katharina & Maertens, Miet & Wollni, Meike, 2018. "The Role of Fairtrade Certification for Wages and Job Satisfaction of Plantation Workers," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 195-212.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender; modern supply chains; vertical coordination; poverty;

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J43 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Agricultural Labor Markets

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