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Offshoring and the Age-Skill Composition of Labour Demand

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  • Sotiris Blanas

Abstract

This paper is the first to study the impact of offshoring on the age-skill composition of labour demand. In doing so, it provides novel empirical evidence firmly supporting the argument that the age profile of a worker is at least as crucial a criterion as the skill to be taken into account by firms while they make optimal labour utilisation adjustments through offshoring. The analysis is conducted on a sample of manufacturing and service industries in 12 developed countries for the period 1995-2005. Its main findings are that material and service offshoring to high-income countries decrease the relative demands for older more skilled workers, while they increase the relative demands for the youngest less skilled. In addition, material and service offshoring to low/middle-income countries decrease the relative demands for the youngest workers, while they mostly increase the relative demands for older workers. These findings are explained by the relative abundance of offshoring destinations in skills and in aspects of employment associated with workers' age profiles, such as the level of human capital and expertise, the returns to training and the level of employment protection.

Suggested Citation

  • Sotiris Blanas, 2017. "Offshoring and the Age-Skill Composition of Labour Demand," Working Papers 209919378, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:lan:wpaper:209919378
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    File URL: http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/media/lancaster-university/content-assets/documents/lums/economics/working-papers/LancasterWP2017_031.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    offshoring; relaitve labour demand; age-skill profile;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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