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Borders, Geography, and Oligopoly: Evidence from the Wind Turbine Industry

Author

Listed:
  • A. Kerem Cosar

    () (The University of Chicago Booth School of Business)

  • Paul L. E. Grieco

    () (The Pennsylvania State University)

  • Felix Tintelnot

    () (The Pennsylvania State University)

Abstract

Using a micro-level dataset of wind turbine installations in Denmark and Germany, we estimate a structural oligopoly model with cross-border trade and heterogeneous firms. Our approach separately identifies border-related from distance-related variable costs and bounds the fixed cost of exporting for each firm. Variable border costs are large: equivalent to roughly 400 kilometers (250 miles) in distance costs, which represents 40 to 50 percent of the average exporter's total delivery costs. Fixed costs are also important; removing them would increase German firms' market share in Denmark by 10 percentage points. Counterfactual analysis indicates that completely eliminating border frictions would increase total welfare in the wind turbine industry by 5 percent in Denmark and 10 percent in Germany.

Suggested Citation

  • A. Kerem Cosar & Paul L. E. Grieco & Felix Tintelnot, 2012. "Borders, Geography, and Oligopoly: Evidence from the Wind Turbine Industry," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1228, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
  • Handle: RePEc:koc:wpaper:1228
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Roberto Rigobon & Brent Neiman & Alberto Cavallo, 2013. "Product Introductions, Currency Unions, and the Real Exchange Rate," 2013 Meeting Papers 1357, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Jose Rodriguez Mora & David Comerford, 2015. "The Gains from Economic Integration," 2015 Meeting Papers 569, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Alberto Cavallo & Brent Neiman & Roberto Rigobon, 2014. "Currency Unions, Product Introductions, and the Real Exchange Rate," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(2), pages 529-595.
    4. Robert C. Feenstra & Philip A. Luck & Maurice Obstfeld & Katheryn N. Russ, 2014. "In Search of the Armington Elasticity," NBER Working Papers 20063, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Cosar, Kerem & Grieco, Paul L. E. & Li, Shengyu & Tintelnot, Felix, 2015. "What Drives Home Market Advantage?," CEPR Discussion Papers 10852, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Li, Jianglong & Lin, Boqiang, 2017. "Does energy and CO2 emissions performance of China benefit from regional integration?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 366-378.
    7. Lu, Ruichang & Luo, Yao & Xiao, Ruli, 2014. "An MPEC estimator for misclassification models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 125(2), pages 195-199.
    8. Herz, Benedikt & Varela-Irimia, Xosé-Luís, 2016. "Border Effects in European Public Procurement," MPRA Paper 76401, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 24 Jan 2017.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Trade costs; oligopoly; spatial competition; constrained MLE.;

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • L20 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - General
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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