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Violent Conflicts and Economic Performance of the Manufacturing Sector in India

Listed author(s):
  • Atsushi Kato

    (School of Business, Aoyama Gakuin University)

  • Takahiro Sato

    (Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration (RIEB), Kobe University, Japan)

We investigate the effects of violent conflicts on the economic performance of manufacturing sector of Indian regional states. The number of violent conflicts, the number of deaths and the number of participants in violent conflicts all have negative impacts on gross value added and capital labor ratio of manufacturing sector. Among violent conflicts, ethnic and religious conflicts, as well as those nested in a large conflict have significantly negative impacts.

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File URL: http://www.rieb.kobe-u.ac.jp/academic/ra/dp/English/DP2016-01.pdf
File Function: First version, 2016
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Paper provided by Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University in its series Discussion Paper Series with number DP2016-01.

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Length: 44 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2016
Handle: RePEc:kob:dpaper:dp2016-01
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