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Households amidst urban riots: The economic consequences of civil violence in India

  • Jaideep Gupte

    ()

    (Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex)

  • Patricia Justino

    ()

    (Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex)

  • Jean-Pierre Tranchant

    ()

    (Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex)

The objective of this paper is to uncover the determinants of riot victimization in India. The analysis is based on a unique survey collected by the authors in March-May 2010 in Maharashtra. We adopt a multilevel framework that allows neighborhood and district effects to randomly influence household victimization. The main results are that households that (i) are economically vulnerable, (ii) live in the vicinity of a crime-prone area, and (iii) are not able to rely on community support are considerably more prone to suffer from riots than other households. All else equal, income per capita increases victimization, presumably through an opportunity cost mechanism. We find further that relatively affluent neighborhoods and those characterized by large caste fragmentation are more riot-prone than disfranchised and homogeneous ones. Victimization is more common in neighborhoods with weaker social interactions, but some evidence suggests that weak social interactions may also be a consequence of rioting.

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File URL: http://www.hicn.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/HiCN-WP-126.pdf
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Paper provided by Households in Conflict Network in its series HiCN Working Papers with number 126.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:126
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.hicn.org

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  1. Williams J. Collins & Robert A. Margo, 2003. "The Labor Market Effects of the 1960s Riots," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 2026, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  2. Anirban Mitra & Debraj Ray, 2014. "Implications of an Economic Theory of Conflict: Hindu-Muslim Violence in India," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 122(4), pages 719 - 765.
  3. William J. Collins & Robert A. Margo, 2004. "The Economic Aftermath of the 1960s Riots: Evidence from Property Values," NBER Working Papers 10493, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Mundlak, Yair, 1978. "On the Pooling of Time Series and Cross Section Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 69-85, January.
  5. Barron, Patrick & Kaiser, Kai & Pradhan, Menno, 2004. "Local conflict in Indonesia : Measuring incidence and identifying patterns," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3384, The World Bank.
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