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Political Violence, Drought and Child Malnutrition: Empirical Evidence from Andhra Pradesh, India

  • Jean-Pierre Tranchant

    ()

    (Institute of Development Studies)

  • Patricia Justino

    ()

    (Institute of Development Studies)

  • Cathérine Müller

    ()

    (Institute of Development Studies)

We analyse the combined effect of political violence and adverse climatic shocks on child nutrition. Instrumental variable models using longitudinal data from Andhra Pradesh, India, yield two key results: (i) drought has an adverse effect on child nutrition in Andhra Pradesh only in violence-affected communities, and (ii) political violence has large negative effects on child nutrition through a reduction of the ability of households to cope with drought. FE-2SLS results are complemented by the use of a unique natural experiment created by a ceasefire in 2004. Results show that the eight months ceasefire period reversed the adverse effects of drought in communities previously affected by the conflict. Potential mechanisms explaining the strong joint welfare effect of conflict and drought are the failure of economic coping strategies in areas of violence and restricted access to public goods and services.

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Paper provided by Households in Conflict Network in its series HiCN Working Papers with number 173.

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Length: 52 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:173
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.hicn.org

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  1. Richard Akresh & Sonia Bhalotra & Marinella Leone & Una Osili, 2012. "War and Stature: Growing Up During the Nigerian Civil War," HiCN Working Papers 113, Households in Conflict Network.
  2. Stefan Dercon, 2003. "Growth and Shocks: evidence from rural Ethiopia," CSAE Working Paper Series 2003-12, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  3. Richard Akresh & Philip Verwimp & Tom Bundervoet, 2011. "Civil War, Crop Failure, and Child Stunting in Rwanda," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(4), pages 777 - 810.
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  5. Stefan Dercon & John Hoddinott & Tassew Woldehanna, 2005. "Shocks and Consumption in 15 Ethiopian Villages, 1999--2004," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 14(4), pages 559-585, December.
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  8. Patrick Domingues & Thomas Barre, 2013. "The Health Consequences of the Mozambican Civil War: An Anthropometric Approach," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(4), pages 755 - 788.
  9. Miguel, Edward & Roland, Gérard, 2011. "The long-run impact of bombing Vietnam," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 1-15, September.
  10. Justino, Patricia & Bruck, Tilman & Verwimp, Philip (ed.), 2013. "A Micro-Level Perspective on the Dynamics of Conflict, Violence, and Development," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199664597.
  11. Abhijeet Singh & Albert Park & Stefan Dercon, 2014. "School Meals as a Safety Net: An Evaluation of the Midday Meal Scheme in India," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 62(2), pages 275 - 306.
  12. Maarten J. Voors & Eleonora E. M. Nillesen & Philip Verwimp & Erwin H. Bulte & Robert Lensink & Daan P. Van Soest, 2012. "Violent Conflict and Behavior: A Field Experiment in Burundi," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(2), pages 941-64, April.
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