IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/iza/izadps/dp9083.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Does Holding a Postdoctoral Position Bring Benefits for Advancing to Academia?

Author

Listed:
  • Lin, Eric S.

    () (National Tsing Hua University)

  • Chiu, Shih-Yung

    () (National Cheng Kung University)

Abstract

Postdoc is a special transitional position for those with a doctoral degree and is usually regarded as an investment to accumulate the additional human and social capital needed to facilitate future job searches or to add to an academic reserve army of unemployed PhDs. Given the prevalence of postdoctoral positions nowadays, it is crucial to explore the role played by postdoctoral participation in the post-PhD labor market. By taking advantage of a comprehensive data set from the National Profiles of Human Resources in Science and Technology in Taiwan, we first explore several characteristics associated with the choice of a postdoctoral position for newly-minted doctoral degree holders, such as age, discipline or the time taken to complete the degree. We then apply the control function approach to address the possible endogenous decision of postdoctoral experience when estimating the effects of postdoctoral positions on the current career choices between academic and non-academic jobs. The empirical results suggest that engaging in postdoctoral positions could increase the probability of advancing to the academic sector by about 6.1%. The heterogeneous effects of gender, major and cohort in regard to the postdoctoral experience are also found by splitting the data. Moreover, we experiment with several groupings for the definition of being awarded an academic position and obtain very robust empirical results.

Suggested Citation

  • Lin, Eric S. & Chiu, Shih-Yung, 2015. "Does Holding a Postdoctoral Position Bring Benefits for Advancing to Academia?," IZA Discussion Papers 9083, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9083
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp9083.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John J. Siegfried & Wendy A. Stock, 2001. "So You Want to Earn a Ph.D. in Economics?: How Long Do You Think It Will Take?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(2), pages 364-378.
    2. Liliane Bonnal & Jean-François Giret, 2008. "The Determinants of Delayed Entrance into the Academic Career : The Case of France," Post-Print halshs-00283733, HAL.
    3. S. Robin & E. Cahuzac, 2003. "Knocking on Academia's Doors: An Inquiry into the Early Careers of Doctors in Life Sciences," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 17(1), pages 1-23, March.
    4. Stock, Wendy A. & Finegan, T. Aldrich & Siegfried, John J., 2009. "Can you earn a Ph.D. in economics in five years?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 523-537, October.
    5. Mangematin, V., 2000. "PhD job market: professional trajectories and incentives during the PhD," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 741-756, June.
    6. Xiaohuan Lan, 2012. "Permanent Visas and Temporary Jobs: Evidence from Postdoctoral Participation of Foreign PhDs in the United States," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(3), pages 623-640, June.
    7. Isabelle Recotillet, 2007. "PhD Graduates with Post‐doctoral Qualification in the Private Sector: Does It Pay Off?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 21(3), pages 473-502, September.
    8. Paula Stephan & Jennifer Ma, 2005. "The Increased Frequency and Duration of the Postdoctorate Career Stage," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 71-75, May.
    9. Michael Spence, 1973. "Job Market Signaling," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 87(3), pages 355-374.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Lu, Xiao & McInerney, Paul-Brian, 2016. "Is it better to “Stand on Two Boats” or “Sit on the Chinese Lap”?: Examining the cultural contingency of network structures in the contemporary Chinese academic labor market," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(10), pages 2125-2137.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    postdoctoral position; PhD; job choice; academia;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9083. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Holger Hinte). General contact details of provider: http://www.iza.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.