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Migraine Headache and Labor Market Outcomes

  • Rees, Daniel I.

    ()

    (University of Colorado Denver)

  • Sabia, Joseph J.

    ()

    (San Diego State University)

While migraine headache can be physically debilitating, no study has attempted to estimate its effects on labor market outcomes. Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the effect of migraine headache on labor force participation, hours worked, and wages. We find that migraine headache is associated with a decrease in wages. However, there is little evidence that migraine headache leads to reductions in labor force participation or hours worked. We conclude that estimates of the cost of migraine headache to society should include its impact on wages.

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File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp7034.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 7034.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7034
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  1. Dr Alex Bryson, 2010. "Do Higher Wages Come at a Price?," NIESR Discussion Papers 2868, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  2. E. Verhofstadt & H. De Witte & E. Omey, 2007. "Are young workers compensated for a high strain job?," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 07/436, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  3. Andre Pradalier & Jean-Paul Auray & Abdelkader El Hasnaoui & Kazem Alzahouri & Jean-Francois Dartigues & Gerard Duru & Patrick Henry & Michel Lanteri-Minet & Christian Lucas & Guy Chazot & Anne-Franco, 2004. "Economic Impact of Migraine and Other Episodic Headaches in France: Data from the GRIM2000 Study," PharmacoEconomics, Springer Healthcare | Adis, vol. 22(15), pages 985-999.
  4. Jenny Berg, 2004. "Economic evidence in migraine and other headaches: a review," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages s43-s54, October.
  5. Bartel, Ann & Taubman, Paul, 1986. "Some Economic and Demographic Consequences of Mental Illness," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(2), pages 243-56, April.
  6. Gerrit Mueller & Erik Plug, 2006. "Estimating the effect of personality on male and female earnings," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 60(1), pages 3-22, October.
  7. Michael French & Laura Dunlap, 1998. "Compensating wage differentials for job stress," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(8), pages 1067-1075.
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