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Labor Force Participation of Married Women in Turkey: Is There an Added or a Discouraged Worker Effect?

Author

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  • Okten, Cagla

    () (Bilkent University)

Abstract

This article analyzes married women's labor supply responses to their husbands' job loss (added worker effect) and worsening of unemployment conditions (discouraged worker effect). We find that married women whose husbands are unemployed or underemployed are more likely to participate in the labor force and work more hours using yearly cross-sectional data from Turkey for the 2000-2010 period. We also construct two year panels based on questions on previous year's labor market outcomes. Panel results provide further support for the added worker effect. Wives whose husbands experience a job loss are more likely to increase their labor force participation. However, a worsening of overall unemployment conditions appears to have a discouraging effect on wives' labor supply response, wives tend to decrease their labor participation when unemployment rate in their region increases.

Suggested Citation

  • Okten, Cagla, 2012. "Labor Force Participation of Married Women in Turkey: Is There an Added or a Discouraged Worker Effect?," IZA Discussion Papers 6616, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6616
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Michael Lokshin & Monica Fong, 2006. "Women's labour force participation and child care in Romania," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(1), pages 90-109.
    2. Margaret Maurer-Fazio & Rachel Connelly & Lan Chen & Lixin Tang, 2011. "Childcare, Eldercare, and Labor Force Participation of Married Women in Urban China, 1982–2000," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(2), pages 261-294.
    3. Aysit Tansel, 2001. "Economic Development and Female Labor Force Participation in Turkey: Time-Series Evidence and Cross-Province Estimates," Working Papers 0124, Economic Research Forum, revised 08 2001.
    4. Miki Kohara, 2010. "The response of Japanese wives’ labor supply to husbands’ job loss," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(4), pages 1133-1149, September.
    5. Baslevent, Cem & Onaran, Ozlem, 2004. "The Effect of Export-Oriented Growth on Female Labor Market Outcomes in Turkey," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1375-1393, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Üngör, Murat, 2014. "Some thought experiments on the changes in labor supply in Turkey," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 265-272.
    2. Ayhan, Sinem H., 2014. "How Do Married Women Respond When Their Husbands Lose Their Jobs? Evidence from Turkey During the Recent Crisis," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100387, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Ayhan, Sinem H., 2015. "Evidence of Added Worker Effect from the 2008 Economic Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 8937, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    female labor force participation; added worker effect; Turkey;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

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