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Training Background and Early Retirement

Author

Listed:
  • Montizaan, Raymond

    () (ROA, Maastricht University)

  • Cörvers, Frank

    () (ROA, Maastricht University)

  • de Grip, Andries

    () (ROA, Maastricht University)

Abstract

Several studies show that employees with firm-specific skills are more likely to be covered by employer-sponsored pension schemes than workers with general skills. Therefore it can be expected that workers with firm-specific skills retire earlier. This paper tests this prediction using US data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men. We find that workers who participated in firm-specific training in their early careers retire earlier than workers with a general training background. This indicates that shared investments in firm-specific training are embedded in implicit contracts that induce early retirement. The results remain robust when controlling for technological change and work commitment.

Suggested Citation

  • Montizaan, Raymond & Cörvers, Frank & de Grip, Andries, 2008. "Training Background and Early Retirement," IZA Discussion Papers 3504, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3504
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Samwick, Andrew A., 1998. "New evidence on pensions, social security, and the timing of retirement," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 207-236, November.
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    4. Smith, Sharon P, 1991. "Ending Mandatory Retirement in the Arts and Sciences," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 106-110, May.
    5. Bingley, Paul & Lanot, Gauthier, 2004. "Employer pay policies, public transfers and the retirement decisions of men and women in Denmark," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 181-200, February.
    6. Chan, Sewin & Stevens, Ann Huff, 2004. "Do changes in pension incentives affect retirement? A longitudinal study of subjective retirement expectations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1307-1333, July.
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    13. Johnson, Richard W, 1996. "The Impact of Human Capital Investments on Pension Benefits," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(3), pages 520-554, July.
    14. Fella, Giulio, 2005. "Termination restrictions and investment in general training," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 1479-1499, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    retirement; deferred compensation; training;

    JEL classification:

    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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