IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ifs/ifsewp/02-09.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Choice of pension scheme and job mobility in Britain

Author

Listed:
  • Richard Disney

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University of Sussex)

  • Carl Emmerson

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and Institute for Fiscal Studies)

Abstract

This paper examines the choice of pension scheme and job mobility in Britain. Workers in Britain can choose to belong wholly to the social security (public pension) programme, or to a company-provided plan (occupational pension), or to purchase their own individual pension. We use household panel data for the 1990s to show that individuals that subsequently move job select pension arrangements that a priori impose lower costs on job mobility. A feature of the British policy experiment, and of the data, is that we can differentiate between choice of actual pension arrangement by the individual and what pension arrangements were offered to that individual. This permits us to test indirectly whether the observed relationship arises from employer selection or from pension scheme design.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson, 2002. "Choice of pension scheme and job mobility in Britain," IFS Working Papers W02/09, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:ifsewp:02/09
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.ifs.org.uk/wps/wp0209.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lazear, Edward P, 1981. "Agency, Earnings Profiles, Productivity, and Hours Restrictions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(4), pages 606-620, September.
    2. Henley, Andrew & Disney, Richard & Carruth, Alan, 1994. "Job Tenure and Asset Holdings," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(423), pages 338-349, March.
    3. Gustman, Alan L. & Steinmeier, Thomas L., 1993. "Pension portability and labor mobility : Evidence from the survey of income and program participation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 299-323, March.
    4. Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Daniel E. Smith, 1983. "The Structure of Private Pension Plans," NBER Chapters,in: Pensions in the American Economy, pages 163-289 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Mealli, Fabrizia & Pudney, Stephen, 1996. "Occupational Pensions and Job Mobility in Britain: Estimation of a Random-Effects Competing Risks Model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(3), pages 293-320, May-June.
    6. James Banks & Carl Emmerson, 2000. "Public and private pension spending: principles, practice and the need for reform," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(1), pages 1-63, March.
    7. McCormick, Barry & Hughes, Gordon, 1984. "The influence of pensions on job mobility," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1-2), pages 183-206.
    8. Richard A. Ippolito, 1987. "Why Federal Workers Don't Quit," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 22(2), pages 281-299.
    9. Lazear, Edward P, 1979. "Why Is There Mandatory Retirement?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(6), pages 1261-1284, December.
    10. Olivia S. Mitchell, 1982. "Fringe Benefits and Labor Mobility," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(2), pages 286-298.
    11. Stock, James H & Wise, David A, 1990. "Pensions, the Option Value of Work, and Retirement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(5), pages 1151-1180, September.
    12. Disney, Richard & Whitehouse, Edward, 1996. "What Are Occupational Pension Plan Entitlements Worth in Britain?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(250), pages 213-238, May.
    13. Schiller, Bradley R & Weiss, Randall D, 1979. "The Impact of Private Pensions on Firm Attachment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 61(3), pages 369-380, August.
    14. Dilnot, Andrew & Disney, Richard & Johnson, Paul & Whitehouse, Edward, 1994. "Pensions policy in the UK: An economic analysis," MPRA Paper 10478, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Andrietti, Vincenzo & Patacchini, Eleonora, 2004. "Occupationa pensions, wages and tenure wage profiles," UC3M Working papers. Economics we043612, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    2. Anna Huysse-Gaytandjieva & Wim Groot & Milena Pavlova, 2013. "A New Perspective on Job Lock," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 112(3), pages 587-610, July.
    3. Birgitta Rabe, 2007. "Occupational Pensions, Wages, And Job Mobility In Germany," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 54(4), pages 531-552, September.
    4. Mariacristina Rossi, 2009. "Examining the Interaction between Saving and Contributions to Personal Pension Plans: Evidence from the BHPS," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 71(2), pages 253-271, April.
    5. Andrietti, Vincenzo, 2004. "Pension choices and job mobility in the UK," UC3M Working papers. Economics we043713, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Pensions; job tenure; labour mobility;

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ifs:ifsewp:02/09. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Emma Hyman). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ifsssuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.