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Pension choices and job mobility in the UK

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  • Andrietti, Vincenzo

Abstract

Using data from the British Household Panel Survey we analyze the impact of second tier pension schemes on voluntary job mobility within a discrete time hazard rate modelling framework. We find that workers covered by occupational pension plans have significantly lower quit rates, independently of their participation decision. Contrary to common policy suggestions, pension portability losses are not important in explaining quits. However, when we account for occupational pensions' endogeneity through instrumental variables, we find that their negative impact on quit hazards is due to "selection on unobservables".

Suggested Citation

  • Andrietti, Vincenzo, 2004. "Pension choices and job mobility in the UK," UC3M Working papers. Economics we043713, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
  • Handle: RePEc:cte:werepe:we043713
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson, 2002. "Choice of pension scheme and job mobility in Britain," IFS Working Papers W02/09, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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    5. Jenkins, Stephen P, 1995. "Easy Estimation Methods for Discrete-Time Duration Models," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(1), pages 129-138, February.
    6. Gustman, Alan L. & Steinmeier, Thomas L., 1993. "Pension portability and labor mobility : Evidence from the survey of income and program participation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 299-323, March.
    7. Steven G. Allen & Robert L. Clark & Ann A. McDermed, 1988. "Why Do Pensions Reduce Mobility?," NBER Working Papers 2509, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Steven G. Allen & Robert L. Clark & Ann A. McDermed, 1993. "Pensions, Bonding, and Lifetime Jobs," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(3), pages 463-481.
    9. Narendranathan, W. & Stewart, M.B., 1989. "Modelling The Probability Of Leaving Unemployment: Competing Risks Models With Flexible Baseline Hazards," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 331, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    10. Mealli, Fabrizia & Pudney, Stephen, 1996. "Occupational Pensions and Job Mobility in Britain: Estimation of a Random-Effects Competing Risks Model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(3), pages 293-320, May-June.
    11. Mallar, Charles D, 1977. "The Estimation of Simultaneous Probability Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(7), pages 1717-1722, October.
    12. J.D. Angrist & Guido W. Imbens & D.B. Rubin, 1993. "Identification of Causal Effects Using Instrumental Variables," NBER Technical Working Papers 0136, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Birgitta Rabe, 2007. "Occupational Pensions, Wages, And Job Mobility In Germany," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 54(4), pages 531-552, September.

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