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The Effects of DACA on Health Insurance, Access to Care, and Health Outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Giuntella, Osea

    () (University of Pittsburgh)

  • Lonsky, Jakub

    () (University of Pittsburgh)

Abstract

This paper studies the effects of the 2012 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) initiative on health insurance coverage, access to care, health care use, and health outcomes. We exploit a difference-in-differences that relies on the discontinuity in program eligibility criteria. We find that DACA increased insurance coverage. In states that granted access to Medicaid, the increase was driven by an increase in public insurance take-up. Where public coverage was not available, DACA eligibility increased individually purchased insurance. Despite the increase in insurance coverage, there is no evidence of significant increases in health care use, although there is some evidence that DACA increased demand for mental health services. After 2012, DACA- eligible individuals were more likely to report a usual place of care and less likely to delay care because of financial restrictions. Finally, we find some evidence that DACA improved self-reported health, and reduced depression symptoms, indicators of stress and anxiety, and hypertension. These improvements are concentrated among individuals with income below the federal poverty level.

Suggested Citation

  • Giuntella, Osea & Lonsky, Jakub, 2018. "The Effects of DACA on Health Insurance, Access to Care, and Health Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 11469, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11469
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Elira Kuka & Na'ama Shenhav & Kevin Shih, 2018. "Do Human Capital Decisions Respond to the Returns to Education? Evidence from DACA," NBER Working Papers 24315, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    4. Carlo Devillanova & Francesco Fasani & Tommaso Frattini, 2014. "Employment of Undocumented Immigrants and the Prospect of Legal Status: Evidence from an Amnesty Program," Development Working Papers 367, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 26 Jun 2014.
    5. Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz, 1999. "Undocumented workers in the labor market: An analysis of the earnings of legal and illegal Mexican immigrants in the United States," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(1), pages 91-116.
    6. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Antman, Francisca, 2016. "Can authorization reduce poverty among undocumented immigrants? Evidence from the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 1-4.
    7. Amy Finkelstein & Sarah Taubman & Bill Wright & Mira Bernstein & Jonathan Gruber & Joseph P. Newhouse & Heidi Allen & Katherine Baicker, 2012. "The Oregon Health Insurance Experiment: Evidence from the First Year," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(3), pages 1057-1106.
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    9. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Francisca Antman, 2017. "Schooling and labor market effects of temporary authorization: evidence from DACA," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(1), pages 339-373, January.
    10. Ortega, Francesc & Edwards, Ryan & Hsin, Amy, 2018. "The Economic Effects of Providing Legal Status to DREAMers," IZA Discussion Papers 11281, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Pope, Nolan G., 2016. "The Effects of DACAmentation: The Impact of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals on Unauthorized Immigrants," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 98-114.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    health insurance; DACA; immigration; health care; health;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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