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Physical Disability and Labor Market Discrimination: Evidence from a Field Experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Bellemare, Charles

    () (Université Laval)

  • Goussé, Marion

    () (Université Laval)

  • Lacroix, Guy

    () (Université Laval)

  • Marchand, Steeve

    () (Université Laval)

Abstract

We investigate the determinants and extent of labor market discrimination toward people with physical disabilities using a large scale field experiment. Applications were randomly sent to 1477 private firms advertising open positions. We find that average callback rates of disabled and non-disabled applicants are respectively 14.4% and 7.2%. We find this differential does not result from accessibility constraints related to firm infrastructures. We also find that mentioning eligibility to a government subsidy to cover the cost of workplace adaptation does not increase callback rates. Finally, we estimate that a lower bound of the proportion of discriminating firms is 49.7%.

Suggested Citation

  • Bellemare, Charles & Goussé, Marion & Lacroix, Guy & Marchand, Steeve, 2018. "Physical Disability and Labor Market Discrimination: Evidence from a Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 11461, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11461
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Audra J. Bowlus & Zvi Eckstein, 2002. "Discrimination and Skill Differences in an Equilibrium Search Model," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(4), pages 1309-1345, November.
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    3. Stijn Baert, 2016. "Wage subsidies and hiring chances for the disabled: some causal evidence," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(1), pages 71-86, January.
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    8. Ravaud, Jean-François & Madiot, Béatrice & Ville, Isabelle, 1992. "Discrimination towards disabled people seeking employment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 951-958, October.
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    12. Eleonora Patacchini & Giuseppe Ragusa & Yves Zenou, 2015. "Unexplored dimensions of discrimination in Europe: homosexuality and physical appearance," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 1045-1073, October.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    discrimination; disabilities; partial identification;

    JEL classification:

    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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