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Conflict and Renewable Resources

Author

Listed:
  • Rafael Reuveny

    (School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University)

  • John W. Maxwell

    (Department of Business Economics and Public Policy, Indiana University Kelley School of Business)

Abstract

The economic literature on conflict employs a static game theoretic frame- work developed by Jack Hirshleifer. We extend this literature by explicitly introducing conflict dynamics into the model. Our specific application is based on two stylized facts. First, conflict often arises over scarce renew- able resources, and second those resources often lack well-defined and/or enforceable property rights. Our stylized model features two rival groups, each dependent on a single contested renewable resource. Each period, the groups allocate their members between resource harvesting and resource appropriation (or conflict) in order to maximize their income. This leads to a complex non-linear dynamic interaction between conflict, the two populations, and the resource. The system's steady states are identified and comparative statics are computed. As developed, the model relates most closely to conflict over renewable resources in primitive societies. The system's global dynamics are investigated in simulations calibrated for the historical society of Easter Island. The model's implications for contemporary lesser developed societies are examined.

Suggested Citation

  • Rafael Reuveny & John W. Maxwell, "undated". "Conflict and Renewable Resources," Working Papers 2004-26, Indiana University, Kelley School of Business, Department of Business Economics and Public Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:iuk:wpaper:2004-26
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    File URL: http://kelley.iu.edu/riharbau/RePEc/iuk/wpaper/bepp2004-26-reuveny-maxwell.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Brander, James A & Taylor, M Scott, 1998. "The Simple Economics of Easter Island: A Ricardo-Malthus Model of Renewable Resource Use," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(1), pages 119-138, March.
    2. Anderton, Charles H & Anderton, Roxane A & Carter, John R, 1999. "Economic Activity in the Shadow of Conflict," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(1), pages 166-179, January.
    3. Ashok Swain, 1996. "Displacing the Conflict: Environmental Destruction in Bangladesh and Ethnic Conflict in India," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 33(2), pages 189-204, May.
    4. James A. Brander & M. Scott Taylor, 1997. "International Trade and Open-Access Renewable Resources: The Small Open Economy Case," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(3), pages 526-552, August.
    5. Skaperdas, Stergios & Syropoulos, Constantinos, 1996. "Can the shadow of the future harm cooperation?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 355-372, May.
    6. Usher, Dan, 1989. "The Dynastic Cycle and the Stationary State," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(5), pages 1031-1044, December.
    7. Hausken, Kjell, 2000. "Cooperation and between-group competition," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 417-425, July.
    8. Grossman, Herschel I & Kim, Minseong, 1995. "Swords or Plowshares? A Theory of the Security of Claims to Property," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1275-1288, December.
    9. Hirshleifer, Jack, 1995. "Anarchy and Its Breakdown," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(1), pages 26-52, February.
    10. Nils Petter Gleditsch, 1998. "Armed Conflict and The Environment: A Critique of the Literature," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 35(3), pages 381-400, May.
    11. Stergios Skaperdas, 1996. "Contest success functions (*)," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 7(2), pages 283-290.
    12. Alexandra Milik & Alexia Prskawetz, 1996. "Slow-fast dynamics in a model of population and resource growth," Mathematical Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(2), pages 155-169.
    13. repec:cup:apsrev:v:79:y:1985:i:04:p:943-957_23 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Alexis Jacquemin, 1987. "The New Industrial Organization: Market Forces and Strategic Behavior," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262600145.
    15. Garfinkel, M.R. & Skaperdas, S., 2000. "Conflict without Misperceptions or Incomplete Information: how the Future Matters," Papers 99-00-11, California Irvine - School of Social Sciences.
    16. John W. Maxwell & Rafael Reuveny, 2000. "Resource Scarcity and Conflict in Developing Countries," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 37(3), pages 301-322, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Adam Jacobsson, 2009. "War and peace—cyclical phenomena?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 141(3), pages 467-480, December.
    2. Garfinkel, Michelle R. & Skaperdas, Stergios, 2007. "Economics of Conflict: An Overview," Handbook of Defense Economics, Elsevier.
    3. Kjell Hausken, 2005. "Production and Conflict Models Versus Rent-Seeking Models," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 123(1), pages 59-93, April.
    4. Rohner, Dominic, 2006. "Beach holiday in Bali or East Timor? Why conflict can lead to under- and overexploitation of natural resources," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 113-117, July.
    5. Rymn J. Parsons, 2011. "Strengthening Sovereignty: Security and Sustainability in an Era of Climate Change," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(9), pages 1-36, August.
    6. Maxwell, John W. & Reuveny, Rafael, 2005. "Continuing conflict," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 30-52, September.
      • John W. Maxwell & Rafael Reuveny, 2004. "Continuing Conflict," Working Papers 2004-27, Indiana University, Kelley School of Business, Department of Business Economics and Public Policy.
    7. John W. Maxwell & Rafael Reuveny & Jefferson Davis, 2007. "Dynamic Winner-take-all Conflict," Working Papers 2007-12, Indiana University, Kelley School of Business, Department of Business Economics and Public Policy.
    8. Miguel A. Espinosa & Juan D. Prada, 2010. "Conflict and Uncertainty: A Dynamic Approach," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 006716, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Conflict; Dynamics; Renewable Resources;

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