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Rising Food and Energy Prices: Projections for Labor Markets 2008-18 and Beyond

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  • Huffman, Wallace

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to examine how the likely growth in the ethanol industry over the next decade will impact U.S. labor markets, especially migrant crop labor, which is largely immigrant labor. To build the background for making projections for 2008-2010 and beyond, the paper reviews and critiques: (i) the size and composition of the U.S. farm labor market, (ii) the demographics and wage of hired farm workers, (iii) the supply of farm workers, and (iv) the factors affecting the demand for farm labor, including new technologies. The final section provides some projections for agricultural labor markets, taking account not only of likely trends in energy prices but also new technologies that will affect labor demand in the future.

Suggested Citation

  • Huffman, Wallace, 2008. "Rising Food and Energy Prices: Projections for Labor Markets 2008-18 and Beyond," Staff General Research Papers Archive 13000, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:13000
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    File URL: http://www2.econ.iastate.edu/papers/p3891-2008-10-28.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kandel, William, 2008. "Profile of Hired Farmworkers, A 2008 Update," Economic Research Report 56461, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Colson, Gregory & Huffman, Wallace E. & Rousu, Matthew C., 2011. "Improving the Nutrient Content of Food through Genetic Modification: Evidence from Experimental Auctions on Consumer Acceptance," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 36(2), August.
    3. Sandler,Todd, 1997. "Global Challenges," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521587495.
    4. Gordon H. Hanson, 2006. "Illegal Migration from Mexico to the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 44(4), pages 869-924, December.
    5. Clare A. Narrod & Keith O. Fuglie, 2000. "Private investment in livestock breeding with implications for public research policy," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(4), pages 457-470.
    6. Huffman Wallace E. & Huffman Sonya K & Rickertsen Kyrre & Tegene Abebayehu, 2010. "Over-Nutrition and Changing Health Status in High Income Countries," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 1-44, June.
    7. Matthew Rousu & Wallace E. Huffman & Jason F. Shogren & Abebayehu Tegene, 2007. "Effects And Value Of Verifiable Information In A Controversial Market: Evidence From Lab Auctions Of Genetically Modified Food," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(3), pages 409-432, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    food prices; energy prices; migrant labor; immigrant labor; agricultural labor; labor intensive agriculture; agricultural technologies;

    JEL classification:

    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General

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