IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/jintdv/v13y2001i7p921-931.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Scales of governance and environmental justice for adaptation and mitigation of climate change

Author

Listed:
  • W.Neil Adger

    (Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research and CSERGE, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK)

Abstract

Global climate change is a significant challenge to structures of governance at all temporal and spatial scales, particularly in the area of managing natural resources. Advances in understanding of the nature of observed and future climate change has led to a realization that significant future impacts are inevitable and increased efforts towards understanding the process of adaptation to the threatened impacts are required. This paper examines the issue of scale of governance relevant for adaptation. The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change is the primary mechanism for co-ordinating international action on the threat of global climate change. The Convention process perceives adaptation as a further rationale for international transfers, in this case to compensate for and prepare for potential or realised impacts. This approach can be justified by recourse to the idea that enhancing sustainable development will enhance adaptive capacity and that planned activities are a key part of overall adaptation. But many adaptations to climate change will be spontaneous actions to perceived and actual risks in the environment. Thus institutional and economic parameters determine the underlying vulnerability and adaptive capacity of societies. I therefore argue that an understanding of adaptation processes allows interventions and planned adaptations at the most appropriate scales. I illustrate these arguments with reference to adaptation in agriculture and outline the insights from interdisciplinary development studies that can inform the climate change debates. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • W.Neil Adger, 2001. "Scales of governance and environmental justice for adaptation and mitigation of climate change," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(7), pages 921-931.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:13:y:2001:i:7:p:921-931
    DOI: 10.1002/jid.833
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.833
    File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin L. Weitzman, 1974. "Prices vs. Quantities," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 41(4), pages 477-491.
    2. Sandler,Todd, 1997. "Global Challenges," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521587495, March.
    3. Barry Smit & Ian Burton & Richard Klein & J. Wandel, 2000. "An Anatomy of Adaptation to Climate Change and Variability," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 223-251, April.
    4. Matthews, R. B. & Kropff, M. J. & Horie, T. & Bachelet, D., 1997. "Simulating the impact of climate change on rice production in Asia and evaluating options for adaptation," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 399-425, July.
    5. Fankhauser, Samuel & Smith, Joel B. & Tol, Richard S. J., 1999. "Weathering climate change: some simple rules to guide adaptation decisions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 67-78, July.
    6. W. Adger & P. Kelly, 1999. "Social Vulnerability to Climate Change and the Architecture of Entitlements," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 253-266, September.
    7. Mendelsohn, Robert & Dinar, Ariel, 1999. "Climate Change, Agriculture, and Developing Countries: Does Adaptation Matter?," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 14(2), pages 277-293, August.
    8. Neil Adger, W., 1999. "Social Vulnerability to Climate Change and Extremes in Coastal Vietnam," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 249-269, February.
    9. Barrett, Scott, 1998. "Political Economy of the Kyoto Protocol," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(4), pages 20-39, Winter.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Sippel, Maike & Jenssen, Till, 2009. "What about local climate governance? A review of promise and problems," MPRA Paper 20987, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Unai Pascual & Roberto Martínez-Espiñeira, 2009. "The effect of environmental change and price policies on livelihoods in tropical agroforestry systems," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(3), pages 433-446.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:1:p:211-:d:127222 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Rübbelke, Dirk T.G., 2011. "International support of climate change policies in developing countries: Strategic, moral and fairness aspects," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(8), pages 1470-1480, June.
    5. Nathan Engle & Ariane Bremond & Elizabeth Malone & Richard Moss, 2014. "Towards a resilience indicator framework for making climate-change adaptation decisions," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 19(8), pages 1295-1312, December.
    6. Osberghaus, Daniel & Finkel, Elyssa & Pohl, Max, 2010. "Individual Adaptation to Climate Change: The Role of Information and Perceived Risk," MPRA Paper 26569, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Yosef Jabareen, 2014. "An Assessment Framework for Cities Coping with Climate Change: The Case of New York City and its PlaNYC 2030," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(9), pages 1-22, September.
    8. Frank Biermann & Michele Betsill & Joyeeta Gupta & Norichika Kanie & Louis Lebel & Diana Liverman & Heike Schroeder & Bernd Siebenhüner & Ruben Zondervan, 2010. "Earth system governance: a research framework," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 277-298, December.
    9. Birte Frommer, 2013. "Climate change and the resilient society: utopia or realistic option for German regions?," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 67(1), pages 99-115, May.
    10. Elissa Waters & Jon Barnett & Aedan Puleston, 2014. "Contrasting perspectives on barriers to adaptation in Australian climate change policy," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 124(4), pages 691-702, June.
    11. Amy Lesen, 2012. "Oil, floods, and fish: the social role of environmental scientists," Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Springer;Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences, vol. 2(3), pages 263-270, September.
    12. Ellen Douglas & Paul Kirshen & Michael Paolisso & Chris Watson & Jack Wiggin & Ashley Enrici & Matthias Ruth, 2012. "Coastal flooding, climate change and environmental justice: identifying obstacles and incentives for adaptation in two metropolitan Boston Massachusetts communities," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 17(5), pages 537-562, June.
    13. Efrat Eizenberg & Yosef Jabareen, 2017. "Social Sustainability: A New Conceptual Framework," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(1), pages 1-16, January.
    14. Heuson, Clemens & Gawel, Erik & Gebhardt, Oliver & Hansjürgens, Bernd & Lehmann, Paul & Meyer, Volker & Schwarze, Reimund, 2012. "Fundamental questions on the economics of climate adaptation: Outlines of a new research programme," UFZ Reports 05/2012, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ).
    15. Pierre Mukheibir & Natasha Kuruppu & Anna Gero & Jade Herriman, 2013. "Overcoming cross-scale challenges to climate change adaptation for local government: a focus on Australia," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 121(2), pages 271-283, November.
    16. Heuson, Clemens & Gawel, Erik & Gebhardt, Oliver & Hansjürgens, Bernd & Lehmann, Paul & Meyer, Volker & Schwarze, Reimund, 2012. "Ökonomische Grundfragen der Klimaanpassung: Umrisse eines neuen Forschungsprogramms," UFZ Reports 02/2012, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ).
    17. Yosef Jabareen, 2012. "Towards a Sustainability Education Framework: Challenges, Concepts and Strategies—The Contribution from Urban Planning Perspectives," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(9), pages 1-23, September.
    18. Micah L. Ingalls & Michael B. Dwyer, 2016. "Missing the forest for the trees? Navigating the trade-offs between mitigation and adaptation under REDD," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 136(2), pages 353-366, May.
    19. Birte Frommer, 2011. "Climate change and the resilient society: utopia or realistic option for German regions?," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 58(1), pages 85-101, July.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:13:y:2001:i:7:p:921-931. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.