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“Decomposition of Differences in PISA Results in Middle Income Countries”

  • Sandra Nieto


    (Faculty of Economics, University of Barcelona)

  • Raul Ramos


    (Faculty of Economics, University of Barcelona)

Our objective is to analyse the role of teacher and school quality to explain differences in students’ educational outcomes. With this aim, we use PISA microdata for 10 middle income and 2 high income countries and we apply decomposition methods in order to identify the role of these factors for different groups of students. Our results show that school and teacher quality and better practices matter even in different institutional settings. From a policy perspective, this evidence supports actions addressed at improving both factors in order to reduce cross-country differences but also between students at the top and bottom distribution in terms of socio-economic characteristics.

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Paper provided by University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics in its series IREA Working Papers with number 201408.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2014
Date of revision: Mar 2014
Handle: RePEc:ira:wpaper:201408
Contact details of provider: Postal: Tinent Coronel Valenzuela, Num 1-11 08034 Barcelona
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  1. Richard Barnett & J. Colin Glass & Roger Snowdon & Karl Stringer, 2002. "Size, Performance and Effectiveness: Cost-Constrained Measures of Best-Practice Performance and Secondary-School Size," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(3), pages 291-311.
  2. Vandenberghe, V. & Robin, S., 2004. "Evaluating the effectiveness of private education across countries: a comparison of methods," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 487-506, August.
  3. Ramos, Raul & Duque, Juan Carlos & Nieto, Sandra, 2012. "Decomposing the Rural-Urban Differential in Student Achievement in Colombia Using PISA Microdata," IZA Discussion Papers 6515, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Ludger Woessmann, 2010. "Cross-Country Evidence on Teacher Performance Pay," CESifo Working Paper Series 3151, CESifo Group Munich.
  5. Wößmann, Ludger, 2003. "Schooling resources, educational institutions and student performance: The international evidence," Munich Reprints in Economics 19661, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
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  7. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  8. repec:bla:ecpoli:v:26:y:2011:i:65:p:5-55 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. Jacob M. Markman & Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin, 2003. "Does peer ability affect student achievement?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(5), pages 527-544.
  10. Eric A. Hanushek & Javier A. Luque, 2002. "Efficiency and Equity in Schools around the World," NBER Working Papers 8949, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Eric A. Hanushek, 2003. "The Failure of Input-Based Schooling Policies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages F64-F98, February.
  12. Hakkinen, Iida & Kirjavainen, Tanja & Uusitalo, Roope, 2003. "School resources and student achievement revisited: new evidence from panel data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 329-335, June.
  13. Smith, Jeremy & Naylor, Robin, 2005. "Schooling effects on subsequent university performance: evidence for the UK university population," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 549-562, October.
  14. Lonnie Stevans & David Sessions, 2000. "Private/Public School Choice and Student Performance Revisited," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 169-184.
  15. Andreas Ammermueller, 2007. "Poor Background or Low Returns? Why Immigrant Students in Germany Perform so Poorly in the Programme for International Student Assessment," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 215-230.
  16. Romina Boarini & Elke Lüdemann, 2009. "The role of teacher compensation and selected accountability policies for learning outcomes: An empirical analysis for OECD countries," OECD Journal: Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2009(1), pages 1-20.
  17. William Sander, 1996. "Catholic Grade Schools and Academic Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(3), pages 540-548.
  18. Peter Dolton & Oscar D. Marcenaro‐Gutierrez, 2011. "If you pay peanuts do you get monkeys? A cross‐country analysis of teacher pay and pupil performance," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 26(01), pages 5-55, January.
  19. Meunier, Muriel, 2011. "Immigration and student achievement: Evidence from Switzerland," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 16-38, February.
  20. Yun, Myeong-Su, 2004. "Decomposing differences in the first moment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 275-280, February.
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