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Market-Driving Behaviors: A Framework for Developing Theory and Practice

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  • Sahay, Arvind

Abstract

Whereas marketing scholars have explored firms’ market-driven behaviors, relatively limited attention has focused on firms’ market-driving behaviors. Early writings on the subject suggest that market-driving behaviors serve as an important complement to market-driven behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework for studying market-driving behaviors and their antecedent conditions. We develop a taxonomy for classifying the different ways in which a firm can drive markets, and delineate the major classes of antecedent conditions under which market-driving behaviors are likely to be observed. An illustrative set of propositions is developed in an effort directed at building theory on the subject. Our framework offers managers a way to structure their strategic thinking in actionable terms. Additionally, the framework offers a platform for further developing theory about market-driving behaviors.

Suggested Citation

  • Sahay, Arvind, 2013. "Market-Driving Behaviors: A Framework for Developing Theory and Practice," IIMA Working Papers WP2013-05-07, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Research and Publication Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:iim:iimawp:12108
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    References listed on IDEAS

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