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Systemic Crisis and Growth Revisited: Has the Global Financial Crisis Marked a New Era?

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  • Sven Steinkamp

    () (Institute of Empirical Economic Research, Osnabrueck University, D-49069 Osnabrueck, Germany)

  • Frank Westermann

    () (Institute of Empirical Economic Research, Osnabrueck University, D-49069 Osnabrueck, Germany)

Abstract

Occasional crises have been shown to be part of growth enhancing mechanism (see Rancière, Tornell and Westermann, 2008). In this paper, we document that neither the stereotypical case study of India vs. Thailand, nor the benchmark growth-regression in this earlier research support this result anymore when updating the sample by one decade that includes the Global Financial Crisis, 2007/8. We analyze the time-varying nature of this relationship in rolling regressions and an historical dataset. In the subset of countries with enforceability problems, we find that the link between occasional crisis, measured by the negative skewness of credit growth, and per-capita output growth still remains intact.

Suggested Citation

  • Sven Steinkamp & Frank Westermann, 2018. "Systemic Crisis and Growth Revisited: Has the Global Financial Crisis Marked a New Era?," IEER Working Papers 112, Institute of Empirical Economic Research, Osnabrueck University.
  • Handle: RePEc:iee:wpaper:wp0112
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chinn, Menzie D. & Ito, Hiro, 2006. "What matters for financial development? Capital controls, institutions, and interactions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 163-192, October.
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    3. Peter Blair Henry, 2007. "Capital Account Liberalization: Theory, Evidence, and Speculation," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(4), pages 887-935, December.
    4. Bekaert, Geert & Harvey, Campbell R. & Lundblad, Christian, 2005. "Does financial liberalization spur growth?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 3-55, July.
    5. Kenneth M. Kletzer, 2004. "Liberalizing Capital Flows in India: Financial Repression, Macroeconomic Policy, and Gradual Reforms," India Policy Forum, Global Economy and Development Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 1(1), pages 227-275.
    6. Aaron Tornell & Frank Westermann & Lorenza Martinez, 2003. "Liberalization, Growth, and Financial Crises: Lessons from Mexico and the Developing World," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 34(2), pages 1-112.
    7. Ross Levine & Norman Loayza & Thorsten Beck, 2002. "Financial Intermediation and Growth: Causality and Causes," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series, in: Leonardo Hernández & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Se (ed.), Banking, Financial Integration, and International Crises, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 2, pages 031-084, Central Bank of Chile.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pawel Dlotko & Simon Rudkin & Wanling Qiu, 2019. "Topologically Mapping the Macroeconomy," Papers 1911.10476, arXiv.org.
    2. Filiz Mızrak & Serhat Yüksel, 2019. "Significant Determiners of Greek Debt Crisis: A Comparative Analysis with Probit and MARS Approaches," International Journal of Finance & Banking Studies, Center for the Strategic Studies in Business and Finance, vol. 8(3), pages 33-50, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Long-Term Growth; Systemic Crisis; Financial Liberalization;

    JEL classification:

    • F34 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Lending and Debt Problems
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises

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