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How Do Exporters Respond to Antidumping Investigations?

  • Yi Lu

    (National University of Singapore)

  • Zhigang Tao

    (The University of Hong Kong and Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research)

  • Yan Zhang

    (Shanghai University of Finance and Economics)

Using monthly transaction data covering all Chinese exporters over the 2000-2006 period, we investigate how Chinese exporters respond to U.S. antidumping investigations. We find that antidumping investigations cause a substantial decrease in the total export volume at the HS-6 digit product level, and that this trade-dampening effect is due to a significant decrease in the number of exporters, yet a modest decrease in the export volume per surviving exporter. We also find that the bulk of the decrease in the number of exporters is exerted by less productive exporters, by direct exporters as opposed to trade intermediaries, and by single-product direct exporters as opposed to their multi-product counterparts. Combined with the existing studies on the effects that antidumping investigations have on protected firms, our study helps piece together a complete picture of the effects of antidumping investigations.

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Paper provided by Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research in its series Working Papers with number 192013.

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Length: 47 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hkm:wpaper:192013
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